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I can see it with my glasses.:laughing:
It looks like it will work.:thumbsup:
The problem I had with using wood for my rails was that the wood swells and contracts and makes it difficult to slide. I need to change mine to aluminum.
 

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How about that white plastic stuff, forget the name. The places I see it they charge a fortune for it. I'd like to use it instead of wood myself but the cost is ridicules.
 

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I read somewhere were you can use those cutting boards made out of a acrylic material for your runners. I have not tried this but it is an idea.

Bruce.
 

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How about that white plastic stuff, forget the name. The places I see it they charge a fortune for it. I'd like to use it instead of wood myself but the cost is ridicules.
That's what I used on my last sled. I purchased it at a woodworking supply store, it was precut for use on a miter sled! Here's is my take on it from that experience with a single miter sled:

1) It is very flexible, and relies on a shallow dado in the sled to insure that it is straight and true.

2) The plastic miter bar was exactly the same width as my table saw miter slot -- the fit was too tight. I tried to sand the sides of the plastic bar, but this did not seem to work.

3) I drilled and tapped the miter track, and used flathead machine screws every 4-5 inches. If the screw were too tight, the sled would bind.

4) The solution to my problem was to run the plastic miter bar through my planner. I used a sled under the bar to keep it flat.

In conclusion, I think the material is stable, smooth, and could be used to make good miter bars, but not the way I did it.

The miter bar I do like is an all metal bar with ball bearing adjusters in one side. I purchased it from WoodCraft several years ago! Only problem is, they were only available in 18" lenth at that time; not really long enough for a large sled!

I used straight-grain Oak for the sled I made last month. It works good for the time being, time will tell!

-Don
 

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I think the white plastic you are talking about is UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyurethane), trade name Hifax. the stuff is widely used for bearing surfaces. It's a bear to sand and has a fairly high temperature coefficiant.

If you want to shape or size the stuff you'll have better luck machining or scraping.
 

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UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyurethane),
I bought some and ended up not using it as there was too much slop side to side. I am getting ready to make another sled and thought I'd play around with drilling a countersink and seeing if I could get some material "raised up" on both sides of the material.
 

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I think the white plastic you are talking about is UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyurethane), trade name Hifax. the stuff is widely used for bearing surfaces. It's a bear to sand and has a fairly high temperature coefficiant.

If you want to shape or size the stuff you'll have better luck machining or scraping.
Yes, that's what I was using. It's not stiff like a hardwood.

-Don
 

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i have been using the white plastic strips on the last two i have made and as long as you use two miter slots then the slop was non existent. however when i went to a single slot and have sled, (one side of blade only) then the looseness in the slot was unacceptable.
 

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I made a sled for my table saw about like what you are talking about. It works great and it only took a evening to do it. It has saved me alot of time too. I made horizontal grooves on both sides of the centerline and made a stop block that I can secure with a carridge bolt for multiple cuts.

A.J
 
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