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Recently I have been doing a lot of trim carpentry for a company and since I cope all my trim I have come to realize my old coping saw is a piece of junk and I've never got into the coping with a jigsaw thing. Seems a little cumbersome for the task at hand. Lol! I think I bought my old saw a couple years ago at Home Depot or Lowes. Anyhow, I didn't want to replace it with another POJ like I already have so I did a search and came across Knew Concepts. If you don't already know they make some really nice coping and fret saws. I have to say I couldn't be happier with my purchase. The biggest problem with the big box store coping saws are they just don't properly tension the blade because the frame tends to flex which leaves you trying to cut with a rubber band. This is not an issue with their saws and you will be coping like a pro in no time. If you are like me and make your living woodworking then 150 bucks is a small price to pay for a quality tool. Cheers!!

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First time I've seen that saw. I usually use my coping saw with the blade turned 90 degrees to the frame so the frame is out of my way. At times I'll twist the blade for making tight corner cuts. I notice the saw doesn't have pins for moving the blade like ordinary coping saws. Do you just release the toggle to rotate the blade? Does the toggle stay in that position? Can you turn one end and keep the other in position easily? With an ordinary coping saw, I can twist the blade while in a cut and return it to a straight position just with the pins and no tension release. This technique turns a corner with a single stroke and no excess pressure to force the blade to change directions.
 

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First time I've seen that saw. I usually use my coping saw with the blade turned 90 degrees to the frame so the frame is out of my way. At times I'll twist the blade for making tight corner cuts. I notice the saw doesn't have pins for moving the blade like ordinary coping saws. Do you just release the toggle to rotate the blade? Does the toggle stay in that position? Can you turn one end and keep the other in position easily? With an ordinary coping saw, I can twist the blade while in a cut and return it to a straight position just with the pins and no tension release. This technique turns a corner with a single stroke and no excess pressure to force the blade to change directions.
+1. :yes: Same here. I've had my coping saws for many years, and they serve me well. I don't remember what they cost in the last century, but $150 seems a bit steep.



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Discussion Starter #6
The saw has 8 different positive stops so the blade can be positioned at different directions. You just release the tension push the ends together to reposition the blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
cabinetman said:
+1. :yes: Same here. I've had my coping saws for many years, and they serve me well. I don't remember what they cost in the last century, but $150 seems a bit steep. .
And I bet you don't have a problem spending the same on a good Dovetail saw? So, what would justify spending 150 bucks on one style saw over another? When you cope as much as I do you would gladly spend that money to use a quality saw verses the crap home store ones.
 

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The frame compression in a dumb coping saw drives me nuts when I am trying to do a rough out for a substantial wood carving. Blades twist and pop out. . . the usual. The Knew Concepts frame is stiff, hard and won't bend. 8 blade orientations. The next big piece I sell, I get one of those.

Maybe I have to release knees, elbows and such. I expect predictable cuts like Calwilliams63 expects.
The reasons are vastly different but the intent and the result are the same.

Smith Brother: you have or you won'tl. You would have to be in my shop on Day One to see the rough out. After that, under a 9/15, a 5/35 and a 2/30 with a 30oz lead core mallet, whatever I did with the coping saw is long gone. I can sell you a nice bag of chunks and chips, though.
Animal Family, Frog Dish. . . others, I forget.
I can start with an adze, my full Stubai or a baby sitka from Kestrel. Some days I just don't need to hack away at it so hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Smith Brother said:
I would love to see some of the things you cope. Thanks, Dale in Indy
Nothing special..... But, a whole lot of poplar trim (crown, base, chair rail, etc) I have a contractor that loves his poplar trim. I like coping since that is the way I had learned and seem to get tighter joints that way. I use my scroll saw and bandsaw for stuff in the shop.
 
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