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I have a DIY project coming up and will be ripping 1/2" and 1" stock, along with the occasional 2x4, or plywood (Both cabinet grade or regular). I have a Freud Diablo D1060X blade on but the last few times I used the saw I felt like I had to push the stock through vs my 24 tooth blade that gracefully feeds the stock though. Is this because the D1060X is more of a cross cutting blade? Reviews on the web said it was a great ripping saw also, but I'm thinking I may need fewer teeth to get that that smoother ripping motion.

Does it make sense to get another 24 tooth blade for ripping? I don't do a ton of wood work so I prefer not to switch the blade a bunch so I'm also considering the D1040X or D1050x as a multiple-purpose/Combination blade. I don't do much, if any cross cutting on my table saw really so thinking I should put the D1060x on my chop saw.

So does a 24 tooth blade almost guarantee tear out and fraying on one side of the cut? I always thought it was pretty smooth with my old 24 tooth but I can't remember since it's been a few years since I switched to the D1060x.

Guess I would bite the bullet and spend the money on the LU87R010/24 tooth($43) or the LU83R010 ($48). Not that I want to spend that but I want to get a good blade to last a long while.

I'm hoping to grab the blade quick at Home Depot or on Amazon prime.


Recommendations welcome:)
 

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in general...

The thicker the stock, the fewer the teeth. Cross grain requires less set and more teeth for the least tear out. For ripping with the grain, use fewer teeth, more set, larger gullets.

That said, I use a Freud Diablo thin kerf, D1040 for 90% of my work on the tablesaw, mostly ripping. I do have a D1024 for thicker stock with 24 teeth. I also have the D1060 on the radial arm saw where I do most of my crosscutting.

The 40 tooth:
Freud D1040X Diablo 10-Inch 40-Tooth ATB General Purpose Saw Blade with 5/8-Inch Arbor and PermaShield Coating - Amazon.com


The 60 tooth:


There is a combination blade with 50 teeth that will do almost everything you need:
 

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If the ripping is limited to stock less than 1", I'll use a 40 tooth combo blade for 90% of the stuff I do. Forrest recommends that when ripping stock thicker than 1", you drop down in tooth count...for them it's the 30 tooth combo blade. The suggested Frued P410 is an excellent choice, I've been using it's predecessor for many years. It's nearing retirement (sharpened about 5 times) and I'll get another .
 

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It could be that your 60T D1060 is dirty, dull, or both....it should handle most 1" ripping pretty well, depending on your saw and the material....flat and straight is easier to rip than if it's rocking or twisting. Since you also do ply, I like the Fusion idea (or the Infinity Super General) or one of the excellent 50T ATB/R blades....D1050, LU83, Infinity Combomax 010-150. There aren't any 24T to 30T rippers I know of the do very well in ply.
 

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Of the blades mentioned I like the Freud D1050X Diablo 10-Inch 50-tooth ATB Combination Saw Blade with 5/8-Inch Arbor and PermaShield Coating - Amazon.com best, it has a raker and will cross cut also. For heavy everyday ripping I don't like a thin blade because they will wander when they get hot. Stay away from DeWalt blades, is my advice. Amana, and CMT use to make a good blade but you would pay more for them back then than what you want to now. Forest is a great blade but for a hobbyist they are a little pricey.
 

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I agree with knotscot to see if cleaning it helps. I have a Marples combo blade (don't recall # of teeth) which works great, but like you, I started finding it took more effort to rip the 4/4 red oak I was using on a project. Cleaned it and was like a new blade again.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi Everyone,
Thanks for the feedback and recommendations all around!

About cleaning the blade, guess I should give that a try first. I put the blade on while I was trimming out a bunch of rooms in my house, mostly 1"X6" finger jointed primed boards being ripped down, but I guess the blade could be a bit gummed.

I ripped some 3/4" yellow pine (Was the sheathing on my old home built in the 20's) and the blade did a great job, absolutely no tear out or anything. BUT, I had a helper who was helping feed the boards on the other end, I usually feel the drag when I am alone.

Blade Recommendations:
Freud P410 - While this sounds really nice, I can't justify the $90 price tag right now since I don't do a ton of work

D1040X/D1050X - These were some the blades I was considering the last time I was shopping and ended up with the D1060X. Since these are readily available at Home Depot to grab off the shelf, if I had to get only 1 and expect to mostly be ripping stock that is 1" or less, which is the better bet? Also know that I am putting the D1060X on my chop saw but can always swap it on if necessary.

Would I expect some tear out with the D1040X while ripping on the bottom side, or is that enough teeth to clean it up without issue?

Man, blades are like shopping for cars, too many options, and the nicer ones are always too hard to justify. Any last recommendations and then i'm going to grab another blade, but not before I clean up my D1060X to see if it helps.
 

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If all else is equal, fewer teeth tends to equate to faster more efficient cuts at the expense of a rougher cut. More teeth tends to mean a cleaner slower cut at the expense of more resistance, more heat and potentially more burning....no free lunch, as no blade is best at everything. The D1040X should rip pretty cleanly without tearout, but you're likely to see traces of tearout on plywood or fine crosscuts. The 60T will have the lowest tearout and cleanest cut, but will pose more resistance in thicker materials than the 40T or 50T. If the material is truly 1" of less, the 60T should yield cleanest results, but the 40T or 50T blades will likely be more versatile and should still leave good results. The new Irwin Marples blades are worth a look too....similar choices and prices, a little bit more carbide...both made in Italy.
 
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