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I bought a new blade for my miter saw. I bought a Freud 60 tooth blade. For some reason it is working less well than the old factory blade. See attached pictures of blade and saw and tear out on 2 workpieces. I am clueless as to the issue and frustrated. Any thought/suggestions????
 

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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Is that plywood? Looks like ply tear out to me, anyway try slowing
your feed rate and you can also try using a sacrificial board underneath. That should help.
 

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The other tips should help, but you should be able to get better results than that....looks like it was cut with a cheap 28T stock blade.....it's possible you've got a bad one. I'd exchange it ....as mentioned, an 80T will be cleaner, but a good 60T should do much better than that. Another reason to exchange it is that it has too steep of a hook angle for a slider. You want a very low to negative hook for that saw....no more than roughly +7°...iirc that blade is +15°.
 

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Looks pretty rough for THAT blade. When a perfect edge is required, I will usually strike a line with a knife and cut against that line. If done carefully, cut is perfect. Takes time to do properly but results are worth it if perfection is the word of the day.
 

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Thanks for comments. Knotscott- would this blade be good for my tablesaw? If not then I will exchange it but of so then I will buy another one for miter saw and keep this one for tablesaw.
 

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where's my table saw?
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just try it

Thanks for comments. Knotscott- would this blade be good for my tablesaw? If not then I will exchange it but of so then I will buy another one for miter saw and keep this one for tablesaw.
I happen to think it's a bad blade, but you can try it in your table saw if you want. See how it cuts. I have the 60 T Diablos and they work fine, no tear out. However if that's the El Cheapo plywood from China, the veneer layer is paper thin. and I wouldn't expect great cut regardless.
There should be no issues for an exchange with a receipt..... hopefully.
 

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Thanks for comments. Knotscott- would this blade be good for my tablesaw? If not then I will exchange it but of so then I will buy another one for miter saw and keep this one for tablesaw.
In general, the D1060x or (Freud Industrial LU88) are both very nice choices for TS where a cleaner cut than a combo blades gives is desired. It won't rip well much over 5/4". However, if your blade is truly defective, it won't cut well in the TS either....definitely worth a try before you exchange it. If it works well in the TS, it could indicate that something's not right on the SCMS.
 

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Thanks for comments. Knotscott- would this blade be good for my tablesaw? If not then I will exchange it but of so then I will buy another one for miter saw and keep this one for tablesaw.
I have one of those in my TS at times and it works great there. If your blade is not defective it will be fine. If that is the imported plywood from china that sort of tear out should be expected, I sometimes wonder how they are able to get the outer wood layer so thin, I had the exact same problem with two different blades on the one sheet of that plywood I used.
 

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rookiewoodworker said:
I bought a new blade for my miter saw. I bought a Freud 60 tooth blade. For some reason it is working less well than the old factory blade. See attached pictures of blade and saw and tear out on 2 workpieces. I am clueless as to the issue and frustrated. Any thought/suggestions????
That blade has a 15-degree positive hook angle. You typically get cleaner cuts on a miter saw with a negative hook angle, of about 8 to ten degrees.
 

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rookiewoodworker said:
Also I forgot to mention that the tearout in the pictures was on the top of the board, not the bottom as u might expect.
Think it through, picture what is happening: On the miter saw the blade comes up through the wood, leaving tear out on the top, the shearing action that leaves a clean edge is on the bottom.

This is the opposite of the table saw which leaves the tear out on the bottom, and the cleaner sheared edge on the top.

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