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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My shop(Basement) has been changed many time around. I think i finally have it as best i can. Untill i take over the rest of the basement. LOL!

I reciently added an assenbly table. It's from an old bennet xray machine table. Heavy metal table. Looks like the plywood top neeeds to be changed. Any suggestions?

Also i reciently mounted my DC and made my thien sep. Also a mount for my clamps. So much better near the front instead of against the wall. No more climbing over things.

Lastly i built a station for my Drill press/Miter saw/ and Mortise mach. Will have doors.. It also holds my compressor/ Has power. No more swapping extension cords.
 

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I would keep the top as is because you are planning to use the table as an assembly table. With that top, you can assemble your projects and any glue that oozes out will not stick to the surface. Go down in your shop now and apply a glob of glue on that surface. Tomorrow you can remove the glob with a putty knife or chisel and not mark the top. As a matter of fact - paint and stains won't stick to it either. Use the same method to remove. I would keep it...
 

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Ditto.

I recently built an outfeed table for my TS using a salvaged Formica bar top.

Because I have a small shop the outfeed table doubles as an assembly and finishing table.

I don't worry about glue or finishes. A putty knife doesn't gouge the surface and finishes come off easily with solvent and a rag.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know the material would work great but it sags in the middle. I am wanting a nice flat level top. I wonder if i put something under it. Would it helo flatten the top piece. You can see the sag in the last pic.
 

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I see the problem and yes, you could add a couple of inside walls or dividers to support the top. Heck, add a couple of drawer slides and build a couple of draws to store your glues, clamps, brushes etc.
 

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That table frame is very nice but the top is shot and only 3/4 thick.

I remembered seeing this in ShopNotes and wishing I had room for it.

Why not build a similar top and mount on your stand?

Two layers of 3/4 MDF, some hardwood strips for edging and some laminate.

I get my laminate from counter top companies who have remnants.

Also, solid surface products such as Corian often come shipped with full sheets of laminate between the sheets of Corian.

These go straight into the trash.

If you decide to go this route PM me. I'd be glad to mail you details about the top construction and hole/slot layout.



must-have-assembly-table-medium.jpg
 
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Now that's an assembly table! Thanks for sharing Jeff
 

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I think so too Bernie,

I was sitting at the outfeed table I previously mentioned as I posted that pic.

I realized that if I add a layer of MDF inside of the already built up perimeter I can make a table similar to the one pictured.

I'll just have to layout the holes and slots around the miter bar easement channels that I plan to rout.
 
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