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Discussion Starter #1
After saving up all my nickels and dimes for the past few months I finally got my new table saw. It seems to be fairly popular on here, so let me know what I should know. Are there any nuances I should know about, things to look out for, modifications for it? I'm already planning to install the additional table to eventually add a router insert so that is in the works. I'm debating between making an attached fold down outfeed table or maybe making a mobile bench that is at the same high and can be used as an outfeed table. Anything else?
 

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- Get a good blade and use the one that came with it for cuts you don't want to use your good blades for.
- Replace the stamped steel wings with your own like this guy did:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/r4512-fence-wing-upgrades-28490/

- Convert to 220V if possible
- Make sure yours doesn't have the alignment problem as it approaches full height (pretty rare anymore but possible)
- Build an outfeed table - many different options here
- Build a few ZCI's
http://lumberjocks.com/Lance09/blog/26858
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/ridgid-r4512-zero-clearance-insert-51660/
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/zci-r4512-46937/index2/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was considering converting to 220. It may happen in the future as wiring up a 220 outlet wouldn't be all that complicated as the breaker box is in the garage and I'm already thinking of adding outlets and more lighting.

A new blade is also in the plans, just figured I'd give the stock blade a run for now so I can start getting the garage set up the way I want. The stock blade cuts fairly well for me right now actually. I just threw together a simple tv stand to allow room for a new speaker we got as a prize at a work party. Cuts decent, but I'm sure a new blade would be an improvement.

The blade was already in perfect alignment, or perfect enough that I don't want to mess with it as I can't tell a difference in relation to the miter slots with my combination square as the measuring device. A dial indicator may show something off, but I don't have one and can't justify the expense just yet. I did have to adjust the fence, both for alignment as well as fit front to back as it was set so tight from the factory I couldn't even get the thing onto the rails. The miter gauge is slightly off, but I think thats normal and I'll just build a nice crosscut sled for this saw to make perfect 90 and 45 degree cuts.

ZCI's will be made after I get the router table insert built and installed, the outfeed table will hopefully get built in the next few weeks as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
one thing I noticed

There doesn't seem to be any onboard storage for the blade guard or anti kick paws. I just thought it was odd as they have storage for the miter gauge and fence so you can store the saw with nothing up top and the blade lowered. However, the lack of storage for the two main important safety items means I'll now need to come up with a way to store them and make it functional the way I want.
 

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...The stock blade cuts fairly well for me right now actually. ...Cuts decent, but I'm sure a new blade would be an improvement.
Adding even a decent quality bargain blade like a Irwin Marples, Freud Diablo, CMT ITK Plus, DW Precision Trim will likely change your definition of cutting "fairly well". You've got several hundred dollars invested....another $30+ for a decent blade will optimize it's performance.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Adding even a decent quality bargain blade like a Irwin Marples, Freud Diablo, CMT ITK Plus, DW Precision Trim will likely change your definition of cutting "fairly well". You've got several hundred dollars invested....another $30+ for a decent blade will optimize it's performance.
Any suggestions on not only a good blade, but maybe a source to get it? I already know a thin kerf blade seems to be the way to go. I'm not objecting to dropping 75-100 dollars on a good blade, but figure I'll get some other things in order first.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks!

That was a lot of info, I feel like I've attended a class at the local college explaining things more clearly. Except, I didn't have to pay for an entire class. Add on top of that, the deals you posted and I might just get a blade or blades sooner than I figured. One more thing, a dado blade is not an immediate purchase for me, but I don't see many 10" dado sets. Is it normal to go with a smaller size dado stack than the normal operating blade or should I find something in the 10" range? The local HD has a Freud dado stack for $99 that I may consider. I'm sure its not as fancy as some of the more expensive stacks, but it looks like it will do the work needed. Although, after reading your info on blades I can actually understand all the other information that is written on those dang things and look at the visual indicators as well. I'm not going to lie, I always thought those laser cut expansion slots were just for looks.
 

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........ A dial indicator may show something off, but I don't have one and can't justify the expense just yet.........
Even a $10 dial gauge from harbor freight mounted to the OEM miter gauge will provide for really "dialing in" your TS. It,s an investment I'd strongly encourage to maximize the performance of your new saw. Proper blade and fence alignment relative to the same miter slot in the table top can aid in reducing the opportunities for kickbacks. Expensive alignment tools aren't necessary, but I was impressed with how much accuracy could be achieved with a properly set up low cost dial gauge. Just my $.02.
 

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Even a $10 dial gauge from harbor freight mounted to the OEM miter gauge will provide for really "dialing in" your TS. It,s an investment I'd strongly encourage to maximize the performance of your new saw. Proper blade and fence alignment relative to the same miter slot in the table top can aid in reducing the opportunities for kickbacks. Expensive alignment tools aren't necessary, but I was impressed with how much accuracy could be achieved with a properly set up low cost dial gauge. Just my $.02.
Is there a good thread for aligning the fence? How would you use the dial gauge?
 

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I also have R4512 and I was a bit upset that I couldn't align blade to miter slot. After several attempts I discovered if you raise a blade up and do alignment the blade will be off when you move it down. But the alignment is always correct if you raise blade up. Thus it's matter to remember that blade should be always raised up to have miter slot and blade in parallel.

I don't know if it's unique for my R4512 or not. Just worth to check if you would have same issue with alignment.
 

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I also have R4512 and I was a bit upset that I couldn't align blade to miter slot. After several attempts I discovered if you raise a blade up and do alignment the blade will be off when you move it down. But the alignment is always correct if you raise blade up. Thus it's matter to remember that blade should be always raised up to have miter slot and blade in parallel.

I don't know if it's unique for my R4512 or not. Just worth to check if you would have same issue with alignment.
that issue is, unfortunately, apparently not unique to your saw as there have been several threads across at least 4 WW forums that i'm aware of from users noting some form of that same problem.
 

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I think most guys go with a smaller dado blade. Maybe a 8 inch dado max on that 10 inch saw. That $99 stack set may be a pretty good buy at your local store.
 

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The alignment issue with the blade up and down must be a flaw in the hybrid design. I sent My Grizzly GO715P back for that reason and didnt get another one because they basically said the problem exists in all of em.

Yes, running a smaller dado is common. My dado stack is an 8"

I highly reccomend the Delta / DeWalt dado stack. Its about the best bang for the buck. Its about 100 bucks but performs like some of the $300 stacks. If you search in the review section of the forum, I reviewed that stack a couple of years ago.
 
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