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Discussion Starter #1
Coming close to having to finish my wine cabinet, but I need advice. I've always done small projects that I put a coat or two of minwax or Cabot on, easy. But this one I found a good site that explained how to do a coat of dye sealer, glaze, sealer, then a top coat. I think I can handle it, but two questions.

1) Do I do this same process for the inside of the cabinet also? Or should I just use a drake of some sort? especially on the drawers, I think I should just put a lacquer on them?

2) How do I go about finishing a project this size? I can't do it all at once. So each compartment inside by itself, each door/drawer by itself, the ends, bottom, back, and top all acting like they're seperate pieces? Oh and the face frame, its not glued on yet. I wanted to finish the insides first to make it easier.

Here's the site, I plan on doing the golden oak version http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs...mp-techniques-for-fantastic-oak-finishes.aspx

And here's a picture of the cabinet so far. The doors aren't mounted yet, and I still need to glue one of them up actually, mount runners for the drawers, then a lot of finish sanding.

I'm traveling right now so I apologize if I don't answer in the next couple of days. And thank you in advance for any advice.
 

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I like the inside of the cabinet to be light in color so I usually stain the faceframe and doors and leave the inside unstained. Then I put the same clear finish on the inside as outside. For a finish I've been using lacquer for 40 years because it's quick and easy but I'm thinking less and less of it as a finish. The next finishing work I do I'm going to make a transition to a conversion varnish or oil based polyurethane. These are a much better and more durable finishes.

As far as finishing your piece if you lack the space to lay out everything at once to finish I would at least stain everything at once. Sometimes if the temperature and humidity is different from one day to the next it can affect the color but golden oak is pretty forgiving. It's when you get to darker colors you should be carefull. When I work on a project where I have millwork being finished and shipped out over many weeks I will make a sample of the wood with stain only and one it and another with stain and finished so I can alter the stain if need be to keep it uniform.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for your reply. I think it's helped out a lot, i'm not as nervous now about it so we'll see how it goes

Edit: just thought... If I only put a finish on the interior, Should I finish the shelves the same way as the interior or exterior? i'm not as worried about the interior sides and back, but with the shelves being right up front i'm unsure if I should stain them or not. They're plywood with hardwood dividers and front edging
 

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Thanks for your reply. I think it's helped out a lot, i'm not as nervous now about it so we'll see how it goes

Edit: just thought... If I only put a finish on the interior, Should I finish the shelves the same way as the interior or exterior? i'm not as worried about the interior sides and back, but with the shelves being right up front i'm unsure if I should stain them or not. They're plywood with hardwood dividers and front edging
I would stain what will be visible from the outside, with the doors stained both sides. That would include the FF face and edges. I would glue the FF on before staining.

For the inside, I would just do a natural finish, but I wouldn't use an oil base finish. It takes a long time to dry, and will smell for a long time. I would use a waterbase polyurethane.






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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks cabinetman! I was a bit nervous also about how I was going to stain the frame then glue it on.

Now I think I can finish this up :)
 
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