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Advanced mistake maker
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I'm making a Walnut framed mirror for the Navy Ball this year, and I wanted a more rustic, "patina" look to it. At work (I work for a high end window and door company), we offer wire brushed Fir. I tried the wire brush attachments for my hand drill, and then tried the one on my bench grinder, but they either took far too long, or were too hard to control in relation to the wood. That's when I put the wire wheel on my table saw. Worked so well, I wished I had tried it a month ago! The surface looks perfect for the look I was after....
 
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Advanced mistake maker
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Discussion Starter #4
johnnie52 said:
We have a rule around here.... No Pics? It didn't happen. Pictures are required, please.
I kinda remember that rule (I even pushed someone else into posting pictures once or twice, lol!). The biggest problem is that the pictures just don't really do the current wood patina justice. I also may rough them up a bit more prior to final fitment.

I suppose you'll want ones of the completed project too, ehh? Darn!
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Well ya...currently all you've done is pull a couple boards out of behind your neighbors garage. We want proof you actually do woodworking...otherwise were gunna start calling you Ted....lol
 

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ryan50hrl said:
Well ya...currently all you've done is pull a couple boards out of behind your neighbors garage. We want proof you actually do woodworking...otherwise were gunna start calling you Ted....lol
Ouch. Ted(dy) is my dog. Busted... Lol!
 

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I wood if I could.
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And now all you've done is take pictures of some items you bought at a yard sale. And your neighbor's dog. Have you no shame!? :laughing:

Just wondering, Is that wire brush rated for the table saw speeds? It may be just fine; I don't know. For all I know, they may normally be spun even faster than that. I just wonder about the possible danger of wires flying loose and becoming darts hurled around the room. I may be way off base here. What are your thoughts on that?
 

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Steve, the wire wheel I bought was rated for a higher rpm. I should add, though, that I had some heavily built-up sap that did rip a few strands of wire loose. However, I figure that as long as you don't stand directly in the line of fire, you're safe. Worked for me, lol!
 
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I guess it depends a lot on the results you are looking for. Wire wheels come in 4 different ways: coarse or fine steel or coarse or fine brass.It also depends on the density of the wood.

I actually like the look of a fairly aggressive soft grain removal followed by sanding. I also like weather cracks ranging from a v chisel to a flat chisel (turned sideways and used like a pencil) to a utility or exacto knife.

Another way to achieve the wire brush effect is sandblasting which raises grain without lines. Achieving realistic weathering is probably more art than techniques.
 

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Warped, I tried those "composite-type" wheels too, and those were the worst I tried (in a hand drill). Followed by both of the fine wheels, then the brass course. The best of the drill arbor wire wheels was the course steel. At least for me, and the look I wanted.
 

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I love that navy sign. What kind of wood is that? Walnut and...? Just a lacquer finish on it?

If jigs and tools were chairs and stools, we'd always have a place to sit.
~Stumpy Nubs
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Dwillems26 said:
I love that navy sign. What kind of wood is that? Walnut and...? Just a lacquer finish on it?

If jigs and tools were chairs and stools, we'd always have a place to sit.
~Stumpy Nubs
Thanks, glad you like it!

Walnut and *drumroll* ..... Maple. All with 2 coats of Polyshades semi-gloss over it. I used a dark Walnut on the Walnut (creative, I know... ;-,). ), and Honey Oak over the Maple. That's why it looks a tad deceptive on wood type. I sanded between coats with 220.
 

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I was going to guess maple, but didn't want to embarrasse myself since i'm not good with wood species. Its very well done, nice clean lines on the letters. I may try to make one with a family name instead or something of that nature, if you don't mind being copied.

Thanks!

If jigs and tools were chairs and stools, we'd always have a place to sit.
~Stumpy Nubs
 

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Discussion Starter #14
By all means, copy away! The sanding of those letters was a complete NIGHTMARE! I would highly recommend a 1" wide detail sander, or fingernail sanding board (which I discovered as I started sanding my third letter...). The live edge bark is something I've wondered about lasting ever since it was given away in '09, as well...
 

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I used to work for theatres, and we always had to make new things look old for our sets.

I once had to make an old-looking hearth for a fireplace, and I beat it with chains and the claw end of a hammer. Really ripped it up and made it look rustic.

Take a pilot bit at an acute angle in multiple places to give it a worm or termite eaten appearance.

Plus, it was fun!
 
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