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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm going to be starting on a desk project this weekend and need some help. I'm planning on using oak plywood to build the two tabletop sections of an L-shaped desk (they will be joined in a separate corner piece). One of the desks will be 82" long and the other will be 68" long. I will have oak boards surrounding each table to provide a 2" frame that will cover the plywood edges. Each table will have 4 oak frame pieces - 2 long to cover the 82" or 68" distance, and 2 short to cover the width of the tables (approximately 24" each).

Now, my question is, will I be able to find a clamp long enough to secure one of those oak boards across the entire 82" (or 68") distance of the table while the glue dries? I plan to use some L-brackets or something underneath the table for extra strength, but I was planning on gluing the frame to the table as well.

I am very new to woodworking so it's also possible I'm heading down the completely wrong path. :laughing:
 

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Scotty D
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+1... Probably cost you $45 per clamp

Or you could just spend $100 per clamp and buy parallel clamps and extensions... lol

Go with pipes...

~tom

Damn, where do you buy your pipe?

Go to a salvage yard and pick up 1/2" or 3/4" black pipe for a fraction of retail. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great info, guys. Stupid question, I need two clamps for each length of pipe, right? One for one end of the table and the other for the other end?
 

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Scotty D
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Great info, guys. Stupid question, I need two clamps for each length of pipe, right? One for one end of the table and the other for the other end?

They are bought in sets, you supply the pipe.

Pipe needs to be threaded atleast 1 end. :smile:
 

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In History is the Future
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BarclayWood said:
Great info, guys. Stupid question, I need two clamps for each length of pipe, right? One for one end of the table and the other for the other end?
You can cut a pipe in half and have two, but then unless you thread the cut end you have no way to extend it. But as to two clamps per pipe, no one "pipe clamp" includes both sides of the clamp jaws. One slides and the other is screwed to the threads on the end of the pipe. The mounted side has a screw thread to tighten the clamp.

~tom
 

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what about some lengths of 2x4 with cleats/blocks screwed to the top 2 inches or so bigger then you need and then make 2 wedges for each cleat. drop your boards in tap the wedges in and your clamped.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You can cut a pipe in half and have two, but then unless you thread the cut end you have no way to extend it. But as to two clamps per pipe, no one "pipe clamp" includes both sides of the clamp jaws. One slides and the other is screwed to the threads on the end of the pipe. The mounted side has a screw thread to tighten the clamp.

~tom
I'm wondering if having two five foot pipes would be a better idea than one ten foot pipe simply for storage reasons. Would threading two pipes together to make a longer one be difficult?
 

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BarclayWood said:
I'm wondering if having two five foot pipes would be a better idea than one ten foot pipe simply for storage reasons. Would threading two pipes together to make a longer one be difficult?
You can buy then threaded on both sides in most box stores... Pick up a couple couplings to connect them...

~tom
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well, I got a bit daunted at the big box store. Two new questions:

1) Would it be possible for me to forego the clamps if I use some L-brackets with screws or brads while the glue is drying? These will be hidden under the lip of the desk, so I'm not worried about their appearance.

2) I picked up some 1/2" wood screws in both #8 and #4 variety. The #4's have a much smaller head and slightly smaller threads. Would one of these be preferable for the oak plywood and oak hardboard I'm using for the trim?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ok, so walk me through this.

1) Pre-drill the holes for my screws.
2) I will glue up the edges, hold them in place (or more likely have someone hold them)...
3) and then screw in my screws to let the glue set.

Sound right?
 
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