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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Doh! realized there's a forum for tools. Will post there too.

Hi Folks,

I'm pretty much a beginner as woodworker however pretty hand with tools and my hands. (Built a table, done a air amount of construction, etc). Anyhoo, looking for table saw recomendations that meets the following parameters.
Lightweight: Gotta yank it out of the basement and into the yard to work.
Decent quality.
Accept dado blades
Accurate enoughfor cutting tenons
As much rip capacity as possible (but remember my weight issue)

My night class woodshop teacher says "Buy the best tools you can afford" (but I can't afford much!) What type of saw do you use or have experience with? Is there a shop saw that I can get up and down the steps? (10 steps)

I welcome any and all suggestions. Thanks so much.

Greg
 

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Sawdust Creator
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As i said in the other thread.....craftsman 21829 or dewalt dw744.

If and only if you need a light weight saw.
 

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I can tell you about the one that I bought.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_89913-46069...+saw&pl=1&currentURL=?Ntt=table+saw&facetInfo=

I really like it however you can only put up to a 1/2" dado set on it. (I wished I would have checked it out better b4 I bought it) You can fold it up and roll it around. It also has extensions both on the side and outfeed which helps. I would suggest if you buy this one, get a shop vac for it to use when you cut so the dust and chips don't hit you in the face. (it didn't take long for me to run out and buy one after just a few cuts)

All in all I'd say it's worth the price, just wish I'd spent more for a better one.

Hope this helps, good luck
 

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I can tell you about the one that I bought.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_89913-46069...+saw&pl=1&currentURL=?Ntt=table+saw&facetInfo=

I really like it however you can only put up to a 1/2" dado set on it. (I wished I would have checked it out better b4 I bought it) You can fold it up and roll it around. It also has extensions both on the side and outfeed which helps. I would suggest if you buy this one, get a shop vac for it to use when you cut so the dust and chips don't hit you in the face. (it didn't take long for me to run out and buy one after just a few cuts)

All in all I'd say it's worth the price, just wish I'd spent more for a better one.

Hope this helps, good luck
X2 on the Porter Cable. Just replaced the old dead Craftsman with it. Does everything the old one did, only does it faster and better, and it really is easy to fold and move about. Like jargo said, it only takes a 1/2" dado set, but I do what few dados I need with a router anyway. I'd give it a 8-9 out of 10.
 

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I have used Delta Unisaws and contractor saws, Dewalt bench top saws, and Ridgid. For the investment, I will recommend the Ridgid. I have had one on the job with me as a finish carpenter for years. Now that I am retired, it is the centerpiece of my basement shop. It is movable, accurate, the table expands out to rip past 24" and it has plenty of power. I just used it with a 1/2" dado stack to cut 1/2" deep dadoes in oak. Sure, you can get bigger saws and fancier ones...for a lot more money, but this one will work great for you.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-1...i_kw=&ci_gpa=pla&ci_src=17588969#.Un_dyPmbMUw
 

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I have used Delta Unisaws and contractor saws, Dewalt bench top saws, and Ridgid. For the investment, I will recommend the Ridgid. I have had one on the job with me as a finish carpenter for years. Now that I am retired, it is the centerpiece of my basement shop. It is movable, accurate, the table expands out to rip past 24" and it has plenty of power. I just used it with a 1/2" dado stack to cut 1/2" deep dadoes in oak. Sure, you can get bigger saws and fancier ones...for a lot more money, but this one will work great for you.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-1...i_kw=&ci_gpa=pla&ci_src=17588969#.Un_dyPmbMUw
I also have owned a version of that same Ridgid saw for over a decade. It's been on many, many jobsites where I've made cabinets onsite with it and asked it to do just about anything else you can imagine. Mine is accurate, dependable and portable. The lifetime warranty that comes with it, if you register online and send in the required paperwork, is an added value, in my opinion.

If you are having to work outside of the basement and need a portable shop/table saw this might be something that would work great for you


he uses a DeWalt but I am sure you could make any portable saw work...
 

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Your gonna really struggle with accuracy with a light weigh saw. Only way for quality work is a good cabinet saw. I just ditched my contractor saw for a new cabinet saw and there is absolutely no comparison. I know ridgid makes a decent hybrid, maybe look into that.
 

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Your gonna really struggle with accuracy with a light weigh saw. Only way for quality work is a good cabinet saw. I just ditched my contractor saw for a new cabinet saw and there is absolutely no comparison. I know ridgid makes a decent hybrid, maybe look into that.
I agree that the lion's share of advantages go to a full size saw with a belt drive induction motor, but I think it's unrealistic to expect him to drag a 300# saw up and down 10 steps everytime he uses it. Sometimes a portable saw is the most feasible solution.
 

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Your gonna really struggle with accuracy with a light weigh saw. Only way for quality work is a good cabinet saw. I just ditched my contractor saw for a new cabinet saw and there is absolutely no comparison. I know ridgid makes a decent hybrid, maybe look into that.

Common man! Your blade is out of round.



Dewalt makes a portable that weighs about 46 LBS and works fine for me. I don't know about the dado blade possibilities.,.,., but would like to know.:blink: I guess it depends on the shaft length and probably better bearings. HP is also necessary for dado cutting, no? Or can you make multiple passes, but if you do that then you have depth issues. Hummm.... build a garage!
 

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I agree that the lion's share of advantages go to a full size saw with a belt drive induction motor, but I think it's unrealistic to expect him to drag a 300# saw up and down 10 steps everytime he uses it. Sometimes a portable saw is the most feasible solution.
That's why I suggested the ridgid...... my brother in law has one and is very pleased with it. Not quite the features of a cabinet saw but for the money I think its a great saw. May take a little more wrestling to get it out of the basement than some others but I think its a great saw.
 

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I have owned the portable Ridgid for over 5 years and would recommend it. I have used dados, both stacked and wobble without problem.

A couple things that will help: Build a crosscut sled and always use sharp, thin kerf blades as they will help when cutting thicker stock.
I am happy with the stock fence. Also an out feed system, whether it is rollers or table will help.
 

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This isn't exactly what you asked for, but here's my advice: a high quality circular saw, an extruded aluminum guide rail and some clamps, and a router.

I've cut tenon shoulders with a circular saw: it just takes good marking and a good guide. I finally sold my table saw, because it didn't do enough of the things I wanted to do and I couldn't afford the space or the money to get one that did. I now use a circular saw for almost everything: I have a pair of 4'1" aluminum bars that lock together, so I can cut 8' pieces easily. Just clamp the rail at each end, and run the saw along it. I have two circular saws: a cordless Ryobi, which I use for small stuff (I think I used that for the tenon shoulder, although these days I just use a hand saw), and an old Skil brand saw. I mostly use the Skill for thick material or long rips, since it's a lot more powerful, but I did rip a 10' 2x10 with the Ryobi. It worked, but I don't recommend it.

And instead of a dado stack, use a router. It's more versatile, and once you've learned to use it it works just as well. (Note: I hate routers, so I haven't learned to use mine that well. But I've seen proof that it can be done.)

A small router with a plunge base, a circular saw, a few bits for the router, and a couple pieces of aluminum straightedge will end up costing a lot less than a good table saw, and be a lot easier to haul out of the basement. And as an added bonus, if you ever get a shop that gives you space for a table saw, you won't be throwing one away to buy a good one.
 

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I have the DeWalt 745 for around the house work. It's done everything I've asked of it and done it well. In many ways it's better than my Delta contractor's saw. I upgraded the blade and it's done the rest. Highly recommended.
 
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This isn't exactly what you asked for, but here's my advice: a high quality circular saw, an extruded aluminum guide rail and some clamps, and a router.

I've cut tenon shoulders with a circular saw: it just takes good marking and a good guide. I finally sold my table saw, because it didn't do enough of the things I wanted to do and I couldn't afford the space or the money to get one that did. I now use a circular saw for almost everything: I have a pair of 4'1" aluminum bars that lock together, so I can cut 8' pieces easily. Just clamp the rail at each end, and run the saw along it. I have two circular saws: a cordless Ryobi, which I use for small stuff (I think I used that for the tenon shoulder, although these days I just use a hand saw), and an old Skil brand saw. I mostly use the Skill for thick material or long rips, since it's a lot more powerful, but I did rip a 10' 2x10 with the Ryobi. It worked, but I don't recommend it.

And instead of a dado stack, use a router. It's more versatile, and once you've learned to use it it works just as well. (Note: I hate routers, so I haven't learned to use mine that well. But I've seen proof that it can be done.)

A small router with a plunge base, a circular saw, a few bits for the router, and a couple pieces of aluminum straightedge will end up costing a lot less than a good table saw, and be a lot easier to haul out of the basement. And as an added bonus, if you ever get a shop that gives you space for a table saw, you won't be throwing one away to buy a good one.
I'd have to say I agree with going this way. Even though I have a table saw I still use my skill saw for a lot of things. I built a two skill saw guides (one rip and one crosscut) and will use them to cut just about anything. (just clamp it on the line and go) (of course a couple of sawhorses are a must)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks all for your posts. This is great stuff! So I think my plan is to save a little more and spend 4-600 bucks (up from 300 or so) and get the Rigid or the Dewalt. Given that I gotta lug this thing up and down the steps every time I want to work (and no space in the basement) a cabine saw won't work for me. I will let you know the final verdict. Thanks again. Greg
 

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What part of the country are you in, Greg? I have a brand new, in the box, Ridgid table saw with the cast iron wings that I purchased as my "shop" saw and then found a cabinet saw. I also have a brand new Ridgid jobsite saw that I purchased a few years ago as a backup saw in case my go-to jobsite saw went south. I don't think it will fail in my lifetime and, if it does, I have the LSA. If you are near me, we could probably come to an agreement...
 

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Thanks for the read- this is just the beginning of my table saw research I have a $170 dollar Craftsman saw and the fence is a big issue
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
mobilepaul said:
What part of the country are you in, Greg? I have a brand new, in the box, Ridgid table saw with the cast iron wings that I purchased as my "shop" saw and then found a cabinet saw. I also have a brand new Ridgid jobsite saw that I purchased a few years ago as a backup saw in case my go-to jobsite saw went south. I don't think it will fail in my lifetime and, if it does, I have the LSA. If you are near me, we could probably come to an agreement...
Mobilepaul, I'm in Philly, PA.
 
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