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Discussion Starter #1
I picked up my RAS today. The previous owner had a homemade plywood table on it with a fixed fence screwed on it. I know there are supposed to be 3 pieces to top. A back table piece, a spacer and the fence.
Does any one have this on a Craftsman RAS that you could measure the width of the back table and the spacer and let me know what the measurements are?
The way he has it fixed the blade does not even clear the fence when it is pushed all way back. I don't know how he even used it that way.
Also the table is not perpendicular with the blade. I assume the only way to square this up is to put shims under the table to level it.
Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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where's my table saw?
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OK, OK, calm down...

That fence was there because it works. That's what I have, a screwed down fence. You can easily locate it and square it to the blade whereever you want it and not be dictated by the "engineered" width of the 3 pieces that came with it. Here's mine and I have extended the table about 36" to the left of the blade to support longer pieces when I crosscut them. That's basically all I do with mine ...crosscut at 90 degrees. Mine is actually 2 pieces screwed together at 90 degrees to get it tall enough.



the other advantage to a one piece top is a clean even surface for a dust collection hood or box as I have made here:

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply but I will still have to redo the top because you can't cut anything the way it is. When you put a piece against the fence the blade is sitting right on top of the board. the fence is so far back the blade will not clear it when pushed all way to rear.
I thought the rear piece and the spacer were used when ripping boards or plywood so you could get a wider rip on your work piece.
 

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I can get you measurements tomorrow. It's OK to set up as original if that works for you. Or you can hop it up if that works as Bill and others have. It's all good. You will figure it out as you use it. Most of us highly recommend against ripping unless you really know what you are doing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I can get you measurements tomorrow. It's OK to set up as original if that works for you. Or you can hop it up if that works as Bill and others have. It's all good. You will figure it out as you use it. Most of us highly recommend against ripping unless you really know what you are doing.

I would appreciate the measurements. I had a RAS in my cabinet shop a few years ago and ripped a lot of boards and plywood on it. I am always very cautious and careful when doing so.
 

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where's my table saw?
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That's part of it, when ripping

I would appreciate the measurements. I had a RAS in my cabinet shop a few years ago and ripped a lot of boards and plywood on it. I am always very cautious and careful when doing so.
The other part is having the nose of the blade guard kissin' the top of the board that you are ripping AnD of course feed the board in against the rotation of the blade. The work first touches the blade on the upward point of it's rotation ..lifting the board off the table, :eek: not good, :thumbdown: that's why the guard is used as a hold down.
Narrow boards are a hazard in my opinion, I wouldn't, too much blade exposed too close to your fingers. :yes:
 

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Back to the original question. The top pieces originally came in with two swappable widths. That is to allow room for different heights of stock for cross cuts. They have nothing to do with ripping.

If you make your own, all you have to do is push the carriage to the rear, set on the saw frame a section of ¾" anything. The blade should be lowered to just below the table top. On top of that, place another piece of what you might think would be the thickest stock you might cut and slide it towards the rear just short of the blade. Behind that stock would be the front edge of where you would place the fence.

You could do this same experiment with ¾" stock, and you can see the differential of where the fence would be positioned in relation to the thicker stock. To make things easy, if you just figured for ¾" stock for fence placement, when cutting, you could just place a spacer ahead of the fence to cut thicker stock.

The sketch below depicts how the factory pieces look...
00043364-00006.jpg






.
 

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Not sure if we've got the same saw. Mine is a 10", circa about 1972.

Measurements on my saw, based on the drawing in Cabinetman's above post:

1: 5 1/8"
2: 2"
3: 3/4" (fence)
4: 19"
 

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To level that table, there shouldn't be any shims required. There should be a way to adjust the assembly, usually the brackets will slie up/down on the side. You can move those back table pieces to get more "reach" when ripping. But like some of the others, I never rip on mine, so I made that back piece as one on my saw. You do want the blade behind the fence when it's all the way to the back of the saw, measure it with a square up against the edge of the blade, and set the fixed table piece at the distance....then you can do whatever you want for the back pieces. Do you have a manual? there are several models you can download over at OWWM. If it's a 119.29400 I have an original I'd be glad to mail you.
 

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minuteman62-64 said:
Not sure if we've got the same saw. Mine is a 10", circa about 1972.

Measurements on my saw, based on the drawing in Cabinetman's above post:

1: 5 1/8"
2: 2"
3: 3/4" (fence)
4: 19"
Wow, sorry arkieman life happened and I completely forgot to respond with measurements. Mine are nearly the same as minuteman62-64 except that #1 is 5". That's on a 1969 saw.
 

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On my circa early 1980's Craftsman RAS the main (front table) 40" x 19". The rear table is 40" x 5". The spacer is 40" x 2". All these parts are made using 1" thick MDF or particleboard. The fence is 40" x 3" high x 3/4" thick. The 2" spacer is cut into two 20" long pieces.

Finally, my main table is covered with 1/4" hardboard (masonite) so I am never cutting into the tabletop itself. The hardboard is screwed down with small brass flathead screws but along the rear it is held down with double faced tape. This allows the top piece to be easily removed for replacement when it gets too cut up.

Let me suggest you attempt to get a copy of the instruction manual for your saw. Placement of attachment hardware is pretty critical. You will also need the manual to properly setup and align your saw. There are a number of adjustments and then need to be performed in a specific order to get optimum accuracy..
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks everyone for the replies. I appreciate the measurements I did download a manual online and glad i did. There is nothing set up right on this saw. The blade is not square with table top or fence. I have a lot of adjustments to make. I am going to take table off and start from scratch with manual instructions. I will surely have more questions in future.
Thanks
George
 
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