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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve been struggling to come up with an idea for cabinet doors all week and don’t know what to do. :confused1: I know this is a simple thing and I should not even be posting this, but I’m about to give up and not have doors at all just to ‘git r done’.

I need two 17 ¼” x 27” doors preferably Red Oak for a Home Theater Center. Want something that looks nice, easy to build and NOT plywood please. :no:

I can’t decide whether to use 2 ½” or 3 ½” wide boards for the frame and I’m undecided on what to do for the panel. I don’t have the wood or equipment for raised panels although if I had the time it might fun to try someday.



I originally had planned on clear Glass, but then remembered that I have some Black Plexiglas stashed away that might look good with the Red Oak. I’m not much of a decorator and things that look OK to me are horrible to everyone else. :thumbdown:

I was briefly thinking about putting the sub woofer inside one of the compartments and thought about building a frame with some fabric stretched over it to fit inside the door frame. Then it could be converted to a solid panel if the fabric doesn’t work out.

Also I know everybody always miter’s the door frames and I can do that, but I’m wondering if I might like the rails just straight & squared off instead just to be different.

Anyway, I’m open to suggestions and opinions. :icon_cool:
 

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If you were going with the clear glass I would use the narrow frame. If you were going with the black plastic I would use the wide frame. Personally I would either leave the cabinet open without doors or if doors were used use the black plastic. I don't care to see the equipment through glass. To me glass doors are for something pretty behind.

The doors could be made like shown with 3/4" plywood cutting the opening by drop cutting on a table saw. The edges could be taped and the back side routed out for the glass. You could also use a tongue and groove set and make styles and rails and after assembly route out the lip on the back side for the glass. If you have a more traditional decor you might get a style and rail set to make traditional cabinet doors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Steve, you mentioned “style and rail set”. Is that a router bit set you’re talking about? I have looked at them in the past, but never knew which one to buy. I guess that would be better than biscuits.

The electronic equipment is all going to be open above the doors because I’ve had too many problems with the remotes in the past.

I wasn’t thinking it through much when I was originally thought of glass and only thought it would be easy, but I have changed my mind about the clear glass because I want to hide the DVDs and stuff. I am also going to have a pullout shelf for the remotes and whatever stuff that nominally accumulates on top and don't want to see that stuff.
 

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I would go with 2½" frame size no matter what else you do with it. You said no plywood, so making a frame that can be versatile might be the way to go. You could make simple half laps for the corners. There's no mitering involved. For the back edge for a panel, no need for rail and stile bits, or doing a tongue and groove.

Take your square edged frame pieces and assemble them with the half laps. Then on the inside edge, just run a rabbeting bit with a bearing around the opening. For the corners chisel them to be square Now you have a door frame that you could add glass, acrylic, plywood panel (if you choose), or a grill cloth.






.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks Cabinetman, I forgot about half laps for the corners. That used to be my only option before I had a table saw and router table.

I just got a good deal on ½” MDF and jschaben mentioned making raised panels out of it on another post. I wasn’t too keen on the idea of MDF for cabinets, but I was just looking on YouTube to see how that Rail & Stile router bits worked and found this YouTube Video. The guy is using MDF for Raised Panels and cut them on the table saw 1st before routing them so now I’m wondering if I could do something with the ½” MDF for panels and just cut them on the Table Saw without routing.


I don’t know if I want to wait on a router bit set or spend that kind of money and I’m still not so sure about MDF, but I like how he did the frame. Maybe I could pick up a cheap set at HF
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What does Reversible Combination mean?

I was looking at some prices of Cabinet door router bit sets and I noticed the reversible router bit set was cheaper. Does that mean a single bit with different combinations?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
On the single bit set, you cut one piece face up and the second piece face down. They are somewhat tricky to get set at first.
Most folks will cut a sample block that aids in set up for repeated cuts.
Bill
Thanks Bill, I guess I don't want that. If i buy a set it will have to be a matching set.
 

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I recently made raised panels on my table saw for a hope chest. I thought it was a extremely long and difficult process till I seen a post on you tube,..."ahh heck I can do that....a few scrap pieces later and I was able to make them with out issue. just make sure your table saw is tuned up. I set my saw at 15 degree's and had a small gap between my blade and the fence when I was done. I'll try and get some pic's today. I would much rather see a wood panel than plexiglass. I would also do as mentioned with the half lap joints, I know your not supposed to make mistakes, but I seem to all the time and the half lap is easier to hide them..:smile:

http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/resource/TablesawTechniques/RaisedPanels/
 

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Thanks Cabinetman, I forgot about half laps for the corners. That used to be my only option before I had a table saw and router table.

I just got a good deal on ½” MDF and jschaben mentioned making raised panels out of it on another post. I wasn’t too keen on the idea of MDF for cabinets, but I was just looking on YouTube to see how that Rail & Stile router bits worked and found this YouTube Video. The guy is using MDF for Raised Panels and cut them on the table saw 1st before routing them so now I’m wondering if I could do something with the ½” MDF for panels and just cut them on the Table Saw without routing.

Making Raised Panel Cabinet Doors On A Router Table - YouTube

I don’t know if I want to wait on a router bit set or spend that kind of money and I’m still not so sure about MDF, but I like how he did the frame. Maybe I could pick up a cheap set at HF
You have a table saw? In your first post in this thread you said you have no way to make raised panels for doors. Making a raised panel with a table saw is one of the simplest projects there is.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I recently made raised panels on my table saw for a hope chest. I thought it was a extremely long and difficult process till I seen a post on you tube,..."ahh heck I can do that....a few scrap pieces later and I was able to make them with out issue. just make sure your table saw is tuned up. I set my saw at 15 degree's and had a small gap between my blade and the fence when I was done. I'll try and get some pic's today. I would much rather see a wood panel than plexiglass. I would also do as mentioned with the half lap joints, I know your not supposed to make mistakes, but I seem to all the time and the half lap is easier to hide them..:smile:

http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/resource/TablesawTechniques/RaisedPanels/
Thanks DT, I was shopping for a Cabinet door router set last night found a Vertical Raised Panel router bit for $30 and a Matched Rail and Stile Router Bit set for $70. I have them in my shopping cart and just struggling to press the checkout button. :yes::no:

I’ve built doors before just using ¼” plywood as my panel with molding glued around the center like a picture frame and thought about just doing that instead of the raised panel.

Then I found Home Depot sells 1x12 Random Length Oak Boards for $6.68 Lf so for about $26 I can buy the wood to make a raised panel. The inside dimensions of my door is 20x10 ¼” if I used the 3 ½” frame so I think the 1x12 would work.

I just don’t know what I want to do because a ¾” thick floating Oak door panel just doesn’t set well with me. I guess I need to find find so I can see and feel it. I could run it through my planner down to ½”, but then I'm getting close to the 1/4".:shifty::laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
You have a table saw? In your first post in this thread you said you have no way to make raised panels for doors. Making a raised panel with a table saw is one of the simplest projects there is.

George
Yes I do have a table saw and I have a Craftsman universal jig to cut vertical pieces. I bought it many years ago and haven't used it that much, but I did cut a raised panel with it. I don't remember much about it except that it was 'not' very good and never made another.:laughing:

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You could do tongue and groove on your table saw for the frames. I did my kitchen with them and had no issues.
That’s another idea and I think I may even have a T&G Router bit that came in a cheap bit set I bought years ago.
 

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Yes I do have a table saw and I have a Craftsman universal jig to cut vertical pieces. I bought it many years ago and haven't used it that much, but I did cut a raised panel with it. I don't remember much about it except that it was 'not' very good and never made another.:laughing:

That universal jig is exactly what I use on my table saw to cut raised panels.

It is just as simple as making any other cut using the saw.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
That universal jig is exactly what I use on my table saw to cut raised panels.

It is just as simple as making any other cut using the saw.

George
Thanks George, I have decided to use 3 ½” Rail & Stiles, but still not sure if I’m going with the raised panel. I bought the 1x4 Red Oak boards today and ordered the Matched Rail & Stile Router Bit set without the raised panel bit.
I have a really nice ¼” Oak panel that is actually for another project and I have to measure out the scrap, but if there is enough, I’ll use it for these doors.
 

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Thanks DT, I was shopping for a Cabinet door router set last night found a Vertical Raised Panel router bit for $30 and a Matched Rail and Stile Router Bit set for $70. I have them in my shopping cart and just struggling to press the checkout button. :yes::no:

I’ve built doors before just using ¼” plywood as my panel with molding glued around the center like a picture frame and thought about just doing that instead of the raised panel.

Then I found Home Depot sells 1x12 Random Length Oak Boards for $6.68 Lf so for about $26 I can buy the wood to make a raised panel. The inside dimensions of my door is 20x10 ¼” if I used the 3 ½” frame so I think the 1x12 would work.

I just don’t know what I want to do because a ¾” thick floating Oak door panel just doesn’t set well with me. I guess I need to find find so I can see and feel it. I could run it through my planner down to ½”, but then I'm getting close to the 1/4".:shifty::laughing:
What home depot charges is about double what I pay for oak. You would pay a premimum for the wider boards from there anyway. You can just glue up narrow boards to make the panels. I normally cut wood about a 1/2" longer than I need and joint the wood and glue a single panel large enough to make several panels. Then when it is dry I joint the edge of the glue up and rip the panels out of it. If you run a raised panel the edge of the panel is 1/4" thick and will fit in the groove the door sticking has. The panels are not glued in to allow for wood expansion. Once the panel is run with a panel raise bit it will look similar to the picture on the edge. There are many different designs. This one is my own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Well I’m finally down to the doors and I bought 3 ½” wide Red oak boards, but after looking at a lot of doors, I think I should be using the 2 ½” instead. So now I’m thinking about using the 1x4s to make the raised panels with and buying more 1x3s.

Should I make the panels out of the 1x4s or buy something else for the panel like 1x6?
 
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