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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm working on a project in the future and would like some input on the type of joint shown below. The picture is just an example of the joint in question. I know how to cut piece number 1 but I'm not certain how to cut piece number 2 so they come together as shown by the arrow.

I was thinking I could cut into the routed or detailed part at a 45 then nibble away the rest of the detailed routed end of piece number 2 on my router table. Will that give me a nice clean and tight joint or is there a better way?

Thanks for your suggestions.

 

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#1 (rail) is butted to #2 (stile). The joinery at that intersection can be: dowels, M&T, pocket screws, biscuits or simply glued. The 'detailed part' is 2 pieces of trim that were glued in place later.

That's all I can infer from your pic and narrative.
 

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Old School
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There's a few ways to do that joint. You could use an M&T (mortise and tenon) in which a mortised hole is made in piece #2, and a tenon is created on the end of #1, shaped to fit the hole. It could be square or round. The end of #1 would have to be figured long to allow for the length of the tenon.

You could use a loose tenon, which is basically a hole on the two pieces, and a dowel used to fit.

You could use a half lap joint which would look like this.






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"I was thinking I could cut into the routed or detailed part at a 45 then nibble away the rest of the detailed routed end of piece number 2 on my router table. Will that give me a nice clean and tight joint or is there a better way?"

Are you trying to make this joint? Or take apart an existing part? Do you think that the pieces of wood labeled 1 and 2 contain that "detailed part" or are separate?

George
 

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where's my table saw?
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I see it differently

I think the issue is how to make a stopped miter on piece No. 2. I think he wants the 3/4" wide flat to run down and butt into the end of piece No. 1. I think how to make a clean 45 degree miter that stops at the beginning of the run is the issue......? Is that it?

We need to know what the problem is before we can offer suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think the issue is how to make a stopped miter on piece No. 2. I think he wants the 3/4" wide flat to run down and butt into the end of piece No. 1. I think how to make a clean 45 degree miter that stops at the beginning of the run is the issue......? Is that it?

We need to know what the problem is before we can offer suggestions.
Home run sir...that's exactly what I wish to do. My intent was to route the detail or trim along the stiles as one piece and then assemble them as they are in the picture. I did not want to use a separate piece of trim and glue it to the stiles, although I could but I would like a cleaner look. I've seen this done in along the lines of some shaker style wainscoting once and it gave it a nice clean look.

I hope this helps to clarify what I'm trying to do. Thanks for all the suggestion.

I will also check out the "jack miter" on youtube that Old Skhool suggest and see what that entails.
 

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I think the easiest way would be to still use a half lap joint, just use a hand saw to trim back the width of the half laps and then the 45's for just the routed inside portion. In the case of the rail, the half lap cut will remove the detail routed edge for you, but you'll still need to make the 45 on it. The stile will require the removal of the detail routed edge and a 45 as well that terminates at the beginning of the half lap. They should give you look you want when put together, I wouldn't even bother putting glue on the 45 degree part, will take stain better that way no chance of squeeze out if you don't use any...lol..gluing the half lap will be more then adequate.
 
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