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Hi Guys,

I am new to this forum and new to home diy... I've been installing crown moulding in my entire house and am getting to the last few cuts and I can not get one angle.

My crown moulding is 3.5" so to cut the 90 degrees, I've been making 45 degrees miter cuts...

this is a downward sloping angle, my protractor says it is a 131 degree angle ... or 49 degree. Can someone please help me on how to make the cut for this angle.

Thank You!

 

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I am assuming you are planning to run the crown down the slope, how are you planning to end the crown at the bottom of the slope? A larger picture showing what is at the bottom of the sloping part of the ceiling will help you get the best answer.

George
 

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I am assuming you are planning to run the crown down the slope, how are you planning to end the crown at the bottom of the slope? A larger picture showing what is at the bottom of the sloping part of the ceiling will help you get the best answer.

George
+1. :yes: A larger picture would provide a better perspective of the area.




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Fit the next piece right up to the wall meeting that corner, and cope the next run of crown to it. I almost never use a miter fitted crown inside corner, unless it's inside a ceiling coffer where all the pans are the same, and it's going to be painted.
 

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This has been discussed several times in the past so you may find it by a search but you can not miter or cope two pieces of moulding the together which are the same size when going from level to rake.
 

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Most of the time when one "crown" is on a level, and meets one on a rake, a special run has to be made for the one on the rake to meet the piece that's level, and all mate up properly.

I can't tell if the plane (ceiling) that the piece already mounted under is level or on a slant. If it's on a slant, the same molding won't work out exactly right. If it is level, the piece to fix against the sloped part to the left can be under cut to fit, but it might leave little to nothing in the cove part at the bottom of the crown. I had to cut the sheetrock some in a case like this once to allow enough clearance so the molding doesn't get cut all the way in two inside the cove.

Here's a way I dealt with this in one case, but it was nothing but luck that the angles and proportions worked out. Usually, I'll end up making something from scratch. It still wasn't perfect, but was close enough not to have to make some.
http://www.historic-house-restoration.com/ArchitecturalDetails.html
 

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Hi Guys,

I am new to this forum and new to home diy... I've been installing crown moulding in my entire house and am getting to the last few cuts and I can not get one angle.

My crown moulding is 3.5" so to cut the 90 degrees, I've been making 45 degrees miter cuts...

this is a downward sloping angle, my protractor says it is a 131 degree angle ... or 49 degree. Can someone please help me on how to make the cut for this angle.

Thank You!


I suggest returning the crown on itself at that corner or cut the angle on the crown to butt to the wall on the left. The wall not being 90 degrees to the floor is a unique situation. Walls that are not 90 to the floor shouldn't really get crown, unless you put a block along the bottom to make up the angle. If it were the ceiling, there are plenty of nice ways to do it, whatever the slope or angle to the other walls.
 

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welcome to the forum. you've been using paint grade, so the inside miters can be "filled" with paintable caulk, as they usually open up when nailed. for future, research "coping" crown moulding. also, on the in-line joints, you may find that a 45 miter on the ends will offer a better hidden joint than a 90 butt joint.

agreed, do a return and not the slope leg.
 
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