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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the process of restoring a craftsman 351.217880 jointer and it is missing some crucial pieces. I am missing the block (part 18420.00), shaft (18419.00), and nut (which is a standard 6-1.00mm hex nut) to keep the fence at 90 degrees

430402


Trying to source originals has been futile. There are none available on eBay, sears/eReplacement discontinued and unavailable, and WEN (who appears to make the same model) has no replacement parts available for purchase. This leave me to make a replacement.

If anyone has this same jointer and would be willing to provide some measurements of the block and shaft I would greatly appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did see that thread, thank you. Unfortunately while he faced many issues (which I'm sure I will also encounter) he had all the parts, even if they were broken. I am missing the pieces entirely.

I would like the dimensions of the block (part 21 in the image from the manual I posted). LxWxH and the locations of the two notches and their depth. The shaft may also be helpful, but I assume as long as I drill the proper size hole thru the block for the shaft I wind up using I'll be ok.

I've never used this particular jointer before, so maybe the size of that block doesn't matter so much as long as it fits in the slot. I am assuming the two notches are used to index the limit plate. With the limit plate seated in the notch closest to the fence would keep the fence at 90° and seated in the notch toward the middle would move the block out of the way to accommodate either of the 45° stops.
 

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He didn't have all the parts, but it was very close. If you wait a couple days, I bet that he gets back to you with those measurements you need. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Sorry, managed to confuse who started that thread (I'm blaming too many irons in the fire and sleep deprivation). Not trying to rush you by any means.

I was hoping that I would be able to avoid the level of disassembly you went through, but all signs are pointing to a full tear down. And I'm 8 for 8 with seized knife screws, curious what screw extractor you had luck with?
 

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I would suggest, if all else fails, take some close up photos showing the slot where the bar is supposed to go and any other shots of the fence that would aid in making a piece. Next I would make a wood bar of the dimensions required and use a long sawed off bolt for the shaft, a "mock up" of the part to eventually be made in metal. Once you know those dimensions, create a dimensioned drawing from which a metal part could be made. Someone here may be able to make it for you OR you can take to a machine shop for pricing.
 

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I got out the jointer and measured the block and related parts. See the photos below. In all photos, the front of the jointer (with the switch) is to the left. The rear of the jointer (with the support for the fence) is to the right.

There is a rod in the front, a block in the middle, a lock nut in the rear which is threaded onto a slotted, threaded "screw rod" at the very rear. I did not disassemble them, hoping to retain my setting for a perfect 90 degree fence. Let me know if you need me to separate and measure the parts. Everything on the jointer seemed to be in mm, so I measured everything with digital calipers in mm. My guesses for "real values" are in parentheses.

Measurements:
  • Tip of rod to end of threaded screw (full length) = 144.8 mm (145 mm?)
  • Diameter of rod in front = 7.94 mm (8 mm?)
  • Rod protrusion in front (as set for 90 degree fence) = 32.4 mm
  • Lock nut in back, flat to flat = 9.8 mm (10 mm?)
  • Diameter of "screw rod" in back with screwdriver slot, including threads = 5.7 mm (??)
  • Screw protrusion in back (as set for 90 degree fence) = 12.0 mm
  • Block:
    • Length, front to back = 100.14 mm (100 mm?)
    • Width, left to right = 15.94 mm (16 mm?)
    • Height, top to bottom = 15.95 mm (16 mm?)

    • Front of block to front of first slot = 10.1 mm (10 mm?)
    • First slot width (front to back) = 6 mm
    • First slot depth (top to bottom of slot) = 3 mm
    • Back of first slot to front of second slot = 35.8 mm (??)
    • Second slot width (front to back) = 6 mm
    • Second slot depth (top to bottom of slot) = 3 mm
    • Back of second slot to back of block = 42.2 mm (??)
  • Block across top -> 10.1 + [6] + 35.8 + [6] + 42.2 mm = 100.1 (See block length = 100.14, above)
Despite the careful precision of my measurements, my feeling is that they don't need to be so accurate. There is considerable side-to-side play where the block can be moved between the cast iron constraints. In my opinion, if you get the distance between the two slots in the block exactly 42 mm or maybe 41.8 mm from the back of Slot 1 to the back of Slot 2, and get the rest of the dimensions "close enough", then you can adjust it to work perfectly as designed. I think that the "slot to slot" distance is the critical dimension.

Photos:
1. Fence Assembly
2. Fence Assembly Closeup
3. Block Assembly - Shows rod, block with slots, screw and nut
4. Rod - closeup
5. Screw and Nut - closeup

I hope this helps. Let me know if you need me to disassemble the rod/screw/block and make further measurements.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you very much for taking the time to get me pictures and accurate measurements! I should have no problem getting the parts replicated with the information you’ve given me.
 

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Sorry, managed to confuse who started that thread (I'm blaming too many irons in the fire and sleep deprivation). Not trying to rush you by any means.

I was hoping that I would be able to avoid the level of disassembly you went through, but all signs are pointing to a full tear down. And I'm 8 for 8 with seized knife screws, curious what screw extractor you had luck with?
Sorry I didn't answer this question sooner. 21

I used a Craftsman screw extractor set that I have had for decades. It has matching drill bits and spiral screw extractors. The parts look nearly identical to the ones in these sets:
https://www.amazon.com/Irwin-Industrial-Tools-11117-Extractors/dp/B000GXBM7Q
https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-BSPE6D-12Piece-Spiral-Extractor/dp/B07G1M1TQG

The tricks were to get the drill straight along the screw, using the hex head to keep the drill bit centered. Pay attention to the drill angle - it must match the screw. I missed on my first screw (got the drill bit angle wrong). That first try took out a few partial threads in the soft aluminum cutterhead - watch out.

The smallest bit didn't grab, but an intermediate size seemed to be just right. I forget whether I used #2 or #3, sorry.

Photos: Sears Craftsman Screw Extractor Set from the early 1980s, probably no longer sold, but many other brands are readily available.

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just a small update. I was able to get the screws out of the cutterhead.

First I tried the liquid wrench, let it soak for 3 days hoping to get lucky. No such luck, it didn't make a dent.

At this point I decided to remove the cutter head from the jointer and got a surprise. After removing the shaft from the cutterhead I expected it to drop out the bottom, mine got stuck. The hole in the bottom is anything but flat. The cast iron is rounded and jagged and the opening was just too small to get the cutterhead out. Thankfully its only cast iron, so a file made quick work of the rough edges and it dropped free. Curious if your was the same way or if you just removed out the top since your infeed table was already off?

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I tried a borrowed craftsman set (not the long spiral flute type) and Grabit Pro set I had. Those just spun in the head.

The Irwin Hanson you linked also did great in the project farm tests so I tried to pick it up, but they were showing delivery dates a couple week out. I wound up purchasing just the Ex-2 and EX-3 from Lowes (I hope I never need the larger 4 and 5, but it's only a couple dollars difference if I'm wrong.). These did the trick. I started with the ex-2 and it didn't want to grab and when I got it to it felt like I was going to snap it. Instead of drilling the the 5/32 hole for the EX-3, I hammered it into the existing 7/64. This seemed to give it great purchase on the screw and I was able to extract the bolt. I successfully removed the 7 remaining screws with the following process:
  • marking center of the screw with a center punch
  • applying tap magic cutting fluid
  • drilling a 5/64" hole, 7/16" deep
  • widening that hole to 7/64"
  • hammering the EX-3 into place
  • crescent wrench to remove.
Not the most fun, but manageable.
 

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[...]
At this point I decided to remove the cutter head from the jointer and got a surprise. After removing the shaft from the cutterhead I expected it to drop out the bottom, mine got stuck. The hole in the bottom is anything but flat. The cast iron is rounded and jagged and the opening was just too small to get the cutterhead out. Thankfully its only cast iron, so a file made quick work of the rough edges and it dropped free. Curious if your was the same way or if you just removed out the top since your infeed table was already off?
[...]
Great update. Thanks for sharing.

I do not remember any problems or issues getting the cutterhead out of the bottom. I never let it drop. I used a wood stick to tap out the cutterhead shaft gently, but not quite all the way. I had the jointer case supported on the sides with wood blocks and tipped it back. I reached underneath with one hand to grab the blade-less cutterhead while I pulled the cutterhead shaft out. The cutterhead came out in my hand, no problem.
 

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mike44
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Sorry, managed to confuse who started that thread (I'm blaming too many irons in the fire and sleep deprivation). Not trying to rush you by any means.

I was hoping that I would be able to avoid the level of disassembly you went through, but all signs are pointing to a full tear down. And I'm 8 for 8 with seized knife screws, curious what screw extractor you had luck with?
Are your knife lock screws right threaded? I have an American Machine & Tool 6" jointer that has left threaded screws.
I am sure you sprayed a solvent on the screws first, also did you try heat with a heat gun? You do not need a torch, just a heat gun or a hair dryer.
If you have done this then try to remove the screws counter-clockwise.
mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Are your knife lock screws right threaded? I have an American Machine & Tool 6" jointer that has left threaded screws.
I am sure you sprayed a solvent on the screws first, also did you try heat with a heat gun? You do not need a torch, just a heat gun or a hair dryer.
If you have done this then try to remove the screws counter-clockwise.
mike
They were standard right hand threads. I skipped the heat mainly because Tool Agnostic didn't have any luck when he tried it. Given how much effort it took to get them out even with the Irwin extractors I really doubt heat, impact, or a combination would've been successful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks to the dimensions provided and a talented and generous friend I have the part that was missing. I was concerned with how well it would maintain 90, but have been pleasantly surprised thus far.

I spent a couple hours of cleanup, sanding, painting. A couple more fighting with the screws. In the end I was able to turn this

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Into this
Automotive tire Rectangle Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive exterior
.

The belts and bearings were in good shape still. I did replace the original blades with a replacement set from Powertec. I plan on sharpening the originals to keep on hand for the inevitable nicks.

I've been running some sugar maple I had on hand thru it and it's handled it like a champ. I'm happy with how it's turned out. It was well worth the time and effort I put into it.
 
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