Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm going to try and make a pull out spice rack similar to this, http://www.durasupreme.com/storage-solutions/pull-out-storage#.UdINhE4o5jo, the second one down. I have a space 4 1/2" next to my stove I would like to build one of these instead of just wasted space. Going to make a frame out of 1/2" plywood and then oak face frame. I don't have enough room to make a raised panel to match my other cabinet doors so I am going to make it match the drawer fronts. I'm not sure how to do this profile, or two profiles if that is what it is. Here is a picture of another drawer showing the edge details. This is looking at it from the top showing the edge and the front is on the right. It's kind of hard to see but the side of it is a little "rounded", or not flat. Then the rounded profile at the corner of the side and front.

kitchen cabinets edge detail.jpg
 

·
bzguy
Joined
·
581 Posts
Unfortunately this looks like it was done in a factory, probably with 4 sided molder, custom knives.
The not so flat spots are shallow coves, getting them in there and leaving beads on corners would be tough.
When I see an unanswered post I take a shot, wish I could be more help, maybe someone can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I appreciate all the help I can get.:thumbsup: Unfortunately I think you are right. It doesn't have to be perfect since this "drawer" face is going to be sideways and won't really match anyway. Just have to get it close.
 

·
bzguy
Joined
·
581 Posts
You could round over the stock on the corners with the right sized bit and then dado or route a flat spot in the middle, that would be kinda close but would leave flat spots on inside of round-overs also?
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
Unfortunately this looks like it was done in a factory, probably with 4 sided molder, custom knives.
The not so flat spots are shallow coves, getting them in there and leaving beads on corners would be tough.
When I see an unanswered post I take a shot, wish I could be more help, maybe someone can.
+1. :yes: Most likely done that way. It might come close done as a cove on the table saw, and using a router bit on the edges. It would be tough to keep it that shallow and have enough on the edge to rout.




.
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
If you get a molding head like this for your table saw you can get blank knives and grind your own designs. The knife in the bottom right corner would be similar to what you have in the center. If three ribs were too much you could grind one off.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
All the above options should work - do the cove 1st and then cut to size and finish with the roundover. I inherited the same set of Craftsman molders from my Dad and own cove bit similar to the profile shown by jschaben. But there are lots of examples on the net on how to make a cove cut using the table saw, just make the cove cut 1st and work the piece down to size and preferred details.
 

·
bzguy
Joined
·
581 Posts
I have one of these, handy item!
The knife in top center tilted over and centered might also make the cove and leave enough stock for the bead?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the great suggestions. I'm not sure I could set this up to cove on the table saw without using a ton of practice pieces.

Do they make a "cone" style router bit?

I'm thinking I'm just going to shave a hair off on the table saw with the blade set on an angle and then use a hand sander to get the rounded profile.
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
Thanks for all the great suggestions. I'm not sure I could set this up to cove on the table saw without using a ton of practice pieces.

Do they make a "cone" style router bit?

I'm thinking I'm just going to shave a hair off on the table saw with the blade set on an angle and then use a hand sander to get the rounded profile.
Hi Ponch - Not sure what you mean by "cone style" router bit??:blink: I'm even less sure how one would help you. They do make cones and several other configurations in carbide burrs. Designed for steel but usable in wood although they plug up pretty quickly in wood.
I've been thinking about your project though. You haven't (or I missed it) said how wide the material is. From the picture I assume about 3/4". I know trying to put in a cove that narrow and that shallow with a table saw would be well beyond my skill level.
I did, however, find a cove box router bit that would give you about a 15/32" wide cove at a 1/32" depth of cut on a router table. I'd suggest doing the roundovers first as the cove removes the reference surface for the roundover.:smile:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1pc-1-2-SH-...-Router-Bit-/140953568894?hash=item20d17cc67e
 

·
bzguy
Joined
·
581 Posts
Hi Ponch -
I've been thinking about your project though. You haven't (or I missed it) said how wide the material is. From the picture I assume about 3/4". I know trying to put in a cove that narrow and that shallow with a table saw would be well beyond my skill level.

I've been thinking about this too!
The cove is the easy part, it getting it in there without removing the stock where the beads are that's tough.
The shallowness of the cove is determined by the height of the table saw blade, the width is determined by the angle of the fence.
Maybe if you get the beads on there, then raise the blade through a panel/jig the same thickness as the beads and then center the blade between them?
The jig would have to be the same width as the cove, maybe clamped to table saw top?
The beads have to be able to ride around it.
Tough set-up, jig is in 2 pieces and clamps would get in the way, double-sided tape?
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top