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Discussion Starter #1
Hello woodworking gurus. I am a beginner looking to build what is basically a large stool. The top is 6" thick by about 16" diameter. Legs are 21" long and about 3" diameter. All the wood is fresh cut. Oak or hardwood.

My problem is I would like to have removable legs and thought hanger bolts and threaded inserts would do the trick. However, upon testing my first stool, the inserts did not hold the hanger bolt and the legs became wobbly. (attached are pics)

My ideas are:
1. use threaded inserts for soft wood with more aggressive thread to hold better.
2. use a super long hanger bolt (7") and go all the way through the seat and countersink bolt in top (might be hard to find a hanger bolt that long and would not look as nice)

Any other ideas????? Your help is greatly appreciated!

-DAVE

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With a top 6" thick, make your legs 3" longer and then counterbore 3" deep holes in the top. Put your inserts at the bottom of the counterbore.

Will take some fairly precision work, but the fit up will be quite strong. Even better if you could manage a very slight taper to legs and counterbore.
 

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I thing the issue you'll have with bolt like that is unless the bolt is perfectly, %100 percent square to the cut surface of the leg, on part of the leg will hit the base of the stool before the. Rest and keep it fro. Turning further. Long bolts from the top could work, but personally I'd go with a mortise and tenon. Make it tight enough to fit with no wiggle room but loose enough to disassemble
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the ideas.
I want to keep this project as simple as possible

The purpose of the legs is just to hold the top on.
The top is a game where you pound nails into it and then when full of nails, replace the top--hence the need for easy-off legs.

any other ideas?

I think the bolt through idea would be least labor and cheapest for hardware (no need for expensive inserts) The downside is I'll have three or four small countersink holes on the top.

Any thoughts?

thanks!
-DAVE
 

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where's my table saw?
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you could .....

drill a 1" hole in both the top and into the legs and put a 1" wood dowel in, shorter than the depth of the holes.

Gule the dowel in the legs lightly, do not glue into the top.

I would use 3 legs rather than 4, since it will always stand evenly and not wobble! :yes:
 

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Simplest solution would be to fasten the legs to a metal plate with long countersunk screws, this would give you a permanent base that you can even the legs up so it does not rock if you wish to use four legs.

Fasten the plate to underside of top with screws, just remove screws to replace top.

The legs should be splayed out a bit to give more stability when the nails are being driven close to outer edge.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
drill a 1" hole in both the top and into the legs and put a 1" wood dowel in, shorter than the depth of the holes.

Gule the dowel in the legs lightly, do not glue into the top.

I would use 3 legs rather than 4, since it will always stand evenly and not wobble! :yes:
I used this idea. I went and bought a 15/16" auger bit for $18 and a 1" pine dowel x 36"

I did three legs and the legs are tight.

I actually pounded in a finish nail in the legs to keep the dowel in the legs.
I drilled about 2" into the top and about 1" into the leg. So I used a 3" dowel.

Here's the questions I have:
1. The legs seem to be in very tight. I am using green fresh-cut wood. What will happen with time to the tightness/fit of the legs into the top?

2. Will a person be able to pull the legs out without breaking the dowels and will they fit into a fresh new top with 1" pre-cut holes OK?

3. Sorry, I am a total amateur--the 15/16 auger bit drilled like a knife through butter, but after about six 2" holes, it did not dig as well. Do you need to sharpen these bits often? How do you do this? Or do they sell better "industrial bits" that stay sharp for a long time. (my goal is to produce many of these eventually)

thanks for your expertise and ideas.

-DAVE
 
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