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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ready to finish a new dining room table I just built. I want to put a VERY durable finish on it that will NOT allow the wood top to be scratched. I've seen self leveling finishes (at least I think they are self leveling) that are clear and very thick AND allow the grain of the wood to show its beauty. Those I've seen have been used in Marine invironments. I think this would be a good choice to avoid scratches on the table. I originally planned on using a piece of quarter inch plexi or regular glass to protect the table top but have found that method to be cost prohibitive ($600 for the size I need) and I'm not willing to put that kind of $$ out. Does anyone have any experience and / or know of a good product that would fit the bill. Please don't say Polyurethane or Varnish...that would not hold up to the abuse this table will probably take. ANY & ALL advice would be appreciated.
 

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The only thing to protect the wood may be a replaceable surface like glass. Glass will resist scratches. Plexi-glass scratches too easily.

The self levelling epoxy you are thinking about is also referred to as bar-top epoxy.

One product mentioned in earlier threads is Envirotek.

Envirotek has been used by a number of people. No experience myself.

http://www.creative-wholesale.com/Envirotex Lite.htm

It will protect the surface, but for many people it looks "too plastic". Personal preference.

It will get scratched up, but you should be able to buff out the scratches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks

Thanks.... The link you sent me is great... it's a bit cheaper than the product another member sent me... and looks as if it does the same thing... Now to figure out how to bathe the 38 X 84 table in it - as well as the side skirts that I applied... hmmmmmmm
 

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Thanks.... The link you sent me is great... it's a bit cheaper than the product another member sent me... and looks as if it does the same thing... Now to figure out how to bathe the 38 X 84 table in it - as well as the side skirts that I applied... hmmmmmmm
Mmm ya that's the hard part. From what I've seen you generally flood it on and let the excess drip off the sides (plastic drop cloth required, of course). From then, I understand you can use a utility knife or such to trim off any drips that you didn't chase off well. Sand the trimmed parts flat then poly the rest of the project.

I suppose you can do a wipe on coat of it on the entire surface (what they call a "seal coat"), but again, it's not something I've tried before.

Good luck, lets us know how you address it and how it worked!
 
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