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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So after work I decided to put a few drawer handles on the new base cabinets in the kitchen. It WAS going well until I noticed something odd about the last one I put on. So I step back and of course the expletives came out once I saw it. The handle is about 3" too far to the left. I forgot to measure the drawer face on this one because the one I did before this one looked very similar in size.

So now I need to fix this problem, but I have no idea how to or where to begin, so I need your guy's help on this one. The cabinets are made from white oak I believe and stained golden oak. Here is a picture
 

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where's my table saw?
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here's what I'd do

I make 2 tapered face grain, Oak plugs, ..... hand carve it, chisel it, sand it, what ever... slightly larger than the screw holes and hammer it in gently and glue it in. It won't be invisible, but it should close up the hole. Then saw it off as flush as possible and sand it down. If you don't want to refinish the drawer front then instead of sawing it, use a very sharp chisel and get it flush with the surface. The handle will hide the right hand hole pretty much leaving only the left hand hole visible.

Another method would be to chisel a small, square opening around the hole and inset a square of matching face grain oak with the grain running parallel to the drawer front. It's like woodworking surgery, so take your time, use sharp tools. Make a practice piece to get comfortable with the process.
 

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Old School
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If you bought the cabinets and drawer fronts, for an absolutely invisible fix...get another drawer front.

If you made these, or have woodworking skills any spot/local repair with a plug or veneer will be noticeable. Not only will you have to level the plug, but will have to chisel/scrap/sand flat. By the time it's flat you have a larger spot with no finish, and likely different in appearance if there was any stain. You could likely fade in grain lines to the repair and touch up the finish to match closely.

If the drawer front doesn't line up to one next to it, you could split it horizontally, joint the edge and re-glue it.

Or, you could rout a narrow groove horizontally the full length of the drawer front and insert a solid wood section.

Or, without any real finishing to do, just use a fill pen (crayon type) with a color to match. Rub in hole and wipe off. You may need to draw in some grain.






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I would route a daddo all the way across the front
and inset a strip of wood the same width.
It'll require complete sanding and refinishing but it would
be invisible.
Building a new front may be easier.
 

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The wood for the drawer front is already three pieces of wood. You could just rip an inch or so out of the middle of it and put a new piece of wood in the center. It looks like the profile on the edge is just a 1/4" round over. You might be able to get most of it with a router and finish the rest of it with a block of wood and some coarse sandpaper.
 

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So after work I decided to put a few drawer handles on the new base cabinets in the kitchen. It WAS going well until I noticed something odd about the last one I put on. So I step back and of course the expletives came out once I saw it. The handle is about 3" too far to the left. I forgot to measure the drawer face on this one because the one I did before this one looked very similar in size.

So now I need to fix this problem, but I have no idea how to or where to begin, so I need your guy's help on this one. The cabinets are made from white oak I believe and stained golden oak. Here is a picture
put another drawer pull on ? right next to the one that is their ? nite look strange , if it fit's oh well you are done , just like a doubble pull ? other wise you are going to plug the hole's and start on finishing ect.
 

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I would not attempt a "plug" fix. Even the best of repairs is going to show and you will hate it for the life of the cabinet.

The "fix" depends upon whether you made or bought this cabinet.

If you made the cabinet I would go with Steve's suggestion.

George
 

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How about gluing an oak veneer over the existing drawer front, trim and sand the edges carefully and re-finish? I thought that routing a strip out as others suggested was a good idea until I looked at the picture again and figure it will show for sure.

Bill
 

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I would go along with Steve on this one - the drawer is 3 pieces of wood. The only other solution I can think of not yet mentioned is to plug the holes with dowels but sink them in a tad and fill the top with a matching melting stick. These are sticks used by cabinet makers to hide mistakes. I got a set from Rockler but you could order the one you need.
 

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where's my table saw?
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OK, here's another idea

Can you rip the drawer front right down the line of holes separating it into 2 halves lengthwise? If the holes disappear in the first pass, glue them back together missing the amount of the saw kerf.
If not make another pass enough to remove the remainder of the hole. Yeah, the front will be slightly less wide, but who will notice and who will care...? :blink:
 

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Old School
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Can you rip the drawer front right down the line of holes separating it into 2 halves lengthwise? If the holes disappear in the first pass, glue them back together missing the amount of the saw kerf.
If not make another pass enough to remove the remainder of the hole. Yeah, the front will be slightly less wide, but who will notice and who will care...? :blink:
You mean like this...

If the drawer front doesn't line up to one next to it, you could split it horizontally, joint the edge and re-glue it.





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where's my table saw?
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kinda sorta

If the adjacent drawer front(s) are higher by 1/8" who would notice, who would care ...especially if they are under the counter overhang.
If the saw cut is clean no need for "jointing" and would depend on the type and quality of the blade. A 60 T should leave a clean cut.

At this point we still don't know if a new front can or would be purchased which is the easiest way to solve the problem. We don't know if the OP has any equipment to do any repairs like a table saw or even a jointer. The solutions that seem easy for us may not be within the OP capability ....I donno? :blink:
 

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handle hole

I would first try the plug route with a plug cutter cutting a similar grained plug(not a dowel). Right now you are the only person who knows about the issue ( besides a few friends here ). If you don't point it out , no one is likely to notice it. But if that doesn't work you could always get a replacement front.
 

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I have done the same thing.Dont feel bad at all.I sharpend a dowel in pencil sharpener.Tapped it in with a dab of glue.Cut it flush.
Maybe try a simple fix first see if you can live with it.If it were for a paying customer one would have too make a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hey guy's! I wanted to thank everyone for possible solutions to solve this problem. I think I will try the plug route first and try to match the finish. Just got to get a plug cutter first and then try it out. If that doesn't work the I can rip it and reglue the face back together.
 

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I'd leave it just as is and if anyone asks I would say " I made a mistake and let it remain that way to show everyone I wasn't as perfect as I thought I was ". Besides, it's perfect for lefties.
 

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where's my table saw?
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plug cutter ....?

Hey guy's! I wanted to thank everyone for possible solutions to solve this problem. I think I will try the plug route first and try to match the finish. Just got to get a plug cutter first and then try it out. If that doesn't work the I can rip it and reglue the face back together.
You might also want to try a leather hole punch with the hollow center. You can punch out a "slug" of face grain from a thin piece of stock over a wooden back up block.

The problem is with any solution that will enlarge the area around the existing holes is that a one kerf rip will not clean up the holes. A simple handmade plug driven into the holes and chiseled off level should be almost invisible. As suggested a wax filler can be applied to even the color OR just apply stain with a small brush until you make the plug "disappear"....
 

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First move the handle. Then several options:

Decorative details through the area. Carve or router.

Escutcheon plate to cover the holes.

Make your own wood drawer / door pulls big enough to hide the holes. If you make the pull large enough you can use the same holes to attach the pull. (A deep Roman Ogee cut into the wood makes the back of the handle recessed.)
 

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I have done the same thing.Dont feel bad at all.I sharpend a dowel in pencil sharpener.Tapped it in with a dab of glue.Cut it flush.
Maybe try a simple fix first see if you can live with it.If it were for a paying customer one would have too make a new one.
Actually if the truth be told all of us that have been doing woodworking for a while has done that. You get tired and think one measurement and mark another. I've seen some very experienced craftsman drill for pulls on the hinge side of a doors. It's usually easier to replace the part then to fight with a patch. I've even burn-in holes like that but once you know it's there you are never satisfied with the repair.
 
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