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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. This is my first post around here; I could really use some help! Attached is a design for a corner desk I've had built out of maple at a 1.25in thickness, however, the rails that are depicted in this plan I have decided to omit, because I was concerned about my ability to join the rails to the underside of the table. I need to know if I can get away without adding additional support to the underside of the table. If I need to add additional support, I'd prefer to use steel, as I do not want to manufacture additional wood support. A friend of mine suggested using steel c-channel, but I do not think I have the skill nor the table top thickness to successfully inlay the c-channel. Any advice? Do you think the table will be strong enough as is?
 

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I don't see the picture..
Just click on his attachment and a file will download, open the file and you will see the entire illustrated build plans for his table. Here is just a portion of one page but viewing only a portion of the plans is like describing an elephant by only a portion of the whole concept.
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You don’t need to inlay it, just screw it on. The only reason to inlay is to hide it, doesn’t add any strength.
 

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Or to keep from putting a knee into it.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Hey guys. This is my first post around here; I could really use some help! Attached is a design for a corner desk I've had built out of maple at a 1.25in thickness, however, the rails that are depicted in this plan I have decided to omit, because I was concerned about my ability to join the rails to the underside of the table. I need to know if I can get away without adding additional support to the underside of the table. If I need to add additional support, I'd prefer to use steel, as I do not want to manufacture additional wood support. A friend of mine suggested using steel c-channel, but I do not think I have the skill nor the table top thickness to successfully inlay the c-channel. Any advice? Do you think the table will be strong enough as is?
Strength or stiffness of the top depends on two things:
Thickness and span.
Maple at 1.25" is very stiff and will not "sag" until the span is 5 ft or more, and then very gradually. However, the greater the unsupported span, the more it will sag.
How are the legs secured? Will the back edge be secured to a wall?
A corner desk "I've had built" is a different type of question than we typically get here.
The dual rails underneath seem like over kill to me....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey guys. I had a local wood shop do the glue up of the tabletop for me, since they do really beautiful glue ups and the price was right. I currently have the tabletop manufactured in 1.25 inch maple at the dimensions attached. I intended to screw metal legs into the tabletop very much like what is pictured in the PDF. I didn’t have the rails made after consulting with another woodworker who said they were overkill and unnecessary, but now I’m not sure. I’m mainly looking to know if you guys think additional support is needed if I choose to omit the rails. The desk will not be secured to the wall.
 

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where's my table saw?
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The OP provides that info in his attachment.
I saw that and edited my original post within minutes.
Or are you just trying to intimidate me.....
 

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where's my table saw?
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where's my table saw?
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That's right, the thread is not about you. The thread is about the table.
Thanks for explaining that Dave. I never would have thought if it weren't for all your quotes and replies.....

Strength or stiffness of the top depends on two things:
Thickness and span.
Maple at 1.25" is very stiff and will not "sag" until the span is 5 ft or more, and then very gradually. However, the greater the unsupported span, the more it will sag.
How are the legs secured? Will the back edge be secured to a wall?
A corner desk "I've had built" is a different type of question than we typically get here.
The dual rails underneath seem like over kill to me....
Seems like I was referring to the table.
 

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Ladies, youre both pretty. How about instead of a pissing match you stick to the topic?

Far as the table goes, 8 feet is a little much to expect 1.25" maple to span without some sagging and flexibility issues. Support would definitely be advised, either in the form of a wood beam glued to the underside of the top, or just a steel channel screwed to the underside. Nothing really fancy is needed to hold the top to the reinforcing pieces, no inlay or anything. Screws work just fine
 

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Can I just use flat steel? I’d like to keep it flush and neat looking.
You could, but flat bar is actually a lot less rigid than the same weight of steel in a tube or channel form. Youd have to use a pretty thick bar to reinforce your top enough to mitigate the sag and flex of the wood, angle, channel, or box profiles would all be stiffer and cheaper
 

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Hey guys. I had a local wood shop do the glue up of the tabletop for me, since they do really beautiful glue ups and the price was right. I currently have the tabletop manufactured in 1.25 inch maple at the dimensions attached. I intended to screw metal legs into the tabletop very much like what is pictured in the PDF. I didn’t have the rails made after consulting with another woodworker who said they were overkill and unnecessary, but now I’m not sure. I’m mainly looking to know if you guys think additional support is needed if I choose to omit the rails. The desk will not be secured to the wall.
WNT has good info, but I think it’s more like 74” of unsupported top at the front. Also depends on weight. Nowadays we don’t have 40# monitors.

So, while I‘m sure you’re ww’ing friend may be right, what if he’s wrong and it does sag!? You’ll have a devil if a time putting that horse back in the barn.

Tough call, IMO always say it’s better to go overboard. Or you could just keep a close eye in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Assuming I’ll need to bite the bullet and reinforce the tabletop…..what could I do at this stage to keep the tabletop looking neat and flush? Running a box profile steel beam under my table top would be absolutely unsightly. I’m hearing flat bar steel is too flexible. I’m willing to pay anyone here willing to help me out and consult with me on how to move forward.
 

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the rails that are depicted in this plan I have decided to omit, because I was concerned about my ability to join the rails to the underside of the table.
I don't see how any other option, could be any less work or more simple, than what the plans call for; 2x4's screwed to the underside of the table. They may not be eloquent, but they certainly are simple to install.

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