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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

I just purchased a lovely dining table for my mother. I intend to get the slight chipping on the top edge repaired and I'm not sure what wood the table is made from and if it's a veneer inlay top? The table is very heavy though?!Thought I'd ask the experts, Any help would be appreciated.

I've attached photos as well.

Cheers in advance.







 

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Open the table right out , remove the middle sections , and look the ends that are not normally on show . See what it looks like .
Take photos too .
 

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This being your 1st post - welcome to wood working talk, a great place to learn, share and make friends. Please introduce yourself in the intro forum, let folks know you're here so they can welcome you.

Manuka is steering you in a good work method for identifying wood. But being from New Hampshire (USA), I would take a leap forward and say that is oak. The grain looks open and the pattern is that of oak. The only alternative in my repertoire would be ash which has the same patterns as oak but has a closed grain.
 

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I agree that the legs and aprons appear to be oak. The top looks to me, to be a laminate top. I don't think and have not see solid wood table tops to chip like that, again I may be wrong. I have a table that used to be her mother, circa early 1900's, and it had a laminate top on it that looked like oak, and probably was. The substrate is made of solid wood but not oak.
 

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Welcome to the group! (Almost sounds like therapy :laughing:)
Nice table. I vote for oak.
From my experiences with tables, spread the table and see what the cross section is--reason being; I doubt the table is all one wood, likely is plywood or particle board under a veneer. If so, it's a matter of finding the right color and finishing.
There's plenty of experience on the forum to help with that.
Dave H
 

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Manuka is steering you in a good work method for identifying wood.
Cheers , but in this instance , I was thinking of the solid timber - veneers issue , not the wood species :smile:
To me the top photo rather points to three veneers and a steam bent edging .
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you

Thank you for all the wonderful information. My name is bonita. I am very excited at the chance of the foundations being oak. Being from Australia, oak is pretty rare around these parts. Veneer or laminate top make sense as where it's chipped it looks like there is ply or some sort of substrate under it. Is veneer a hard thing to repair?

If I get any other furniture I am unsure of in regards to the wood or finish, I know where to come :thumbsup:
 

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Veneer or laminate top make sense as where it's chipped it looks like there is ply or some sort of substrate under it. Is veneer a hard thing to repair?
Is the chipping in the photo the only damage ?

Oak is rather rare here too , or was
Imported white oak , with a bit of red thrown in , is being used locally here these days .
Our local (exotic) oak trees grow too fast to be of the same caliber , and also tend to be rather short in the trunk .
 

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The top I could agree with, but I just can't see how anyone can think the legs look like oak. They look like maybe mahogany to me ("maybe mahogany" being the kind that grows somewhere in the wilds of South America, as opposed to the "definitely mahogany" kind which grows elsewhere.)
 
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