Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am pretty new to woodworking and need some advice on how to get a perfect edge on a 45 degree miter on a 24" high hollow square column made from 4 pieces for a desk lamp. I am using a Frank Lloyd Wright lamp as a rough model. It has a column with the edge joints completely invisible.

I am using hardwoods and have pretty good equipment. How does one totally hide the joint? Will a stain hide it? Do I need wood filler and sanding? Would a router do the job?

Any advice would be appreciated.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,027 Posts
WELCOME TO THE FORUM

If I understand your question you want to miter the vertical edges of four pieces 24" long. A lock miter router bit will provide a good glue joint and if machined smoothly on straight stock that is consistent in thickness will give a good fit. It will not produce an invisible line, as there are many variables. A differential in color, and grain can make it obvious. An attempt to filling and sanding may help but I'm not putting any money on that to be 100% successful.

A better idea of the joint looks like this:
.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Hi Robert,

I think if you have a well set up mitre saw (i.e. 45 degrees really is 45 degrees and the blade doesn't flex during cutting) you should be OK. I'm not sure I'd like to see a novice working with a Lock Mitre bit, they can be extremely fierce! But I agree with Cabinet man on the need for square, even stock for the joint. If at the end you do have a lip, careful use of a finishing sander or plane along the face with the overhang will help. Be sure to go along the board and not up and down the joint face.

Regards,

Orson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the help. I checked out YouTube and discovered a few helpful videos on several aspects of woodworking. I will practice with the jointer until I can get the miter corner to where I am satisfied that it is mostly hidden.
 

·
Senior Member from MN
Joined
·
219 Posts
The October 2007 issue of Fine Woodworking has an article on "gap free joints". I think there is a picture showing the glue up of a column box with miters on the corners. It's either in that same article or another article. Or it's in the October issue of Wood magazine. I bought two magazines this month and can't remember which one has the picture I am thinking of. She was using spring clips on the corners to press them together. Good luck.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,373 Posts
Hve you tried a miter fold? You only need to deal with one joint, the rest are sealed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
The best way to get an invisible mitrejoint, is, if you cut the mitre at 45.5 to 46 degrees. Lay them flat next to each other and use packaging tape all along the the joint to hold it together.
You do this on three of the joins, turn the whole thing over, apply glue on all for joins, fold it up and tape the fourth joint with strips of tape as close together as you can. Stretch the tape enough to close the join.
I reckon this is the only way to get perfect mitre joins. because the moisture in the glue is pushing it slightly apart.

I believe very much in this method and it does'nt need any special tools, besides a reasonable good saw..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I agree with Hobelspan with his method, but I also like to use a 45 deg router bit with a bearing and a straight edge for long pieces. Using the router bit and a handheld router allows for any variations in flatness of my material thus giving me a perfect 45 deg joint every time. Just don't run your finger along the edge as it is razor sharp.
 

·
Cabinetmaker
Joined
·
646 Posts
Roberth; regardless which method you use for the miter,the best way for near perfect grainmatching is to use a single board wide enuf to rip all 4 pcs from. Match mark each one so you miter each to its matching edge.
JackM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Use any of the above methods, but before you sand use the shaft of a screwdriver on the corners to lightly burnish them down. After you sand the surfaces you'll have nice tight corners. I've made quite a few hollow posts this way.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top