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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to fasten this 1x2 Oak board on the bottom of a cabinet and I was going to just glue it with Gorilla Wood glue, but almost everything I glued lately has fallen apart. I bought a dowel jig, but that’s a little more involved than I expected.

So I’m thinking of using Liquid Nails Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive instead. What do you think? I’d sure like to do this tonight so it can dry by morning.



I’m desperate so I posted at a few different forums trying to get a quick answer, so sorry.
 

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+1 on the TB
I haven't become a fan of the gorilla glue---yet
Dave H
 
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I agree. Clamp every 12 or so inches and let it cure overnight. An hour after clamping, scrape the squeezed out glue with a chisel. It will be putty-like and easily removed.

Blue
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would just use TB II or TB III, and clamp up. Give it time to cure...couple of hours to overnight.






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Thanks Cabinetman, I do have some of that, but do you think it will be strong enough even if it’s not a tight joint?

Its 55” long and I messed up the straightness a little by sanding it. I should have just left the saw cut. :shifty:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is it going to have stress on it?
Only if someone steps on it like my son. He like to prop one foot up while looking at the stuff on the cabinet. :eek:
 

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Are you attaching it to the edges of the plywood as shown in the photo OR does the whole unit rest on top of the frame?

Make certain you coat the raw plywood several times with the glue brush as it will soak in If it's attached there.

You can use some brad nails to attach it also if you don't mind the small holes.

I've had decent luck with Gorilla Wood Glue on my antique chair restoration project. Typically I use TB 2 for all other projects. Properly applied it doesn't seem to make much difference.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f9/what-chairs-these-39917/
 
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Thanks Cabinetman, I do have some of that, but do you think it will be strong enough even if it’s not a tight joint?

Its 55” long and I messed up the straightness a little by sanding it. I should have just left the saw cut. :shifty:
You could also do some straightening with some sanding with a long block sander, shop made from hand held belt sander belts, and a substrate cut to fit inside the belt...like these below...
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11l0y2u.jpg






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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Are you attaching it to the edges of the plywood as shown in the photo OR does the whole unit rest on top of the frame?http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f9/what-chairs-these-39917/
It’s just the plywood edge and a couple of 2x2s that I was going to use for the dowels and clamping. I don’t know what is going on with the Gorilla Glue, It’s been outside and maybe the heats got to it, I don’t know.
Here is a close up.





So if everybody is in agreement with the TB II than that's what I'll do :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know there are not a lot if biscuit joiner fans on here - but that looks like a great application for a few biscuits.
You know I was just thinking about that as I was sanding. I got a biscuit cutter for Christmas one year and I have never used it. Maybe this is my chance.:yes:

Thanks for the suggestion. :thumbsup:
 

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It's just a face frame so all suggestions (TB2 - construction adhesive - biscuit jointer) should work. As an experiment, I once glued 2 scrap pieces
of bamboo flooring, finished side to finished side, using construction adhesive and they are bonded forever. TB2 would not glue those 2 pieces together because of the finish. But your working with clean bare wood surfaces so even TB2 should work.

The only problem with the construction adhesives (and Gorilla glue) is they expand so you'll need to deal with glue stained wood that will affect your finished product. No stain or finish will penetrate wood that has glue residue on it. But there are ways to deal with the problem...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well I really wanted to get this done tonight, but the more I thought about it the more I liked minuteman’s idea of the biscuits.

I just don’t trust the glue by itself anymore so I’m going to use the biscuits in the plywood so I guess I’ll have to wait till morning because I need to find and set up the Biscuit Cutter.

Thanks to everyone who replied and I will be using the Titebond II instead of the Gorilla Glue.
 

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I know there are not a lot if biscuit joiner fans on here - but that looks like a great application for a few biscuits.
+1 on the biscuits #10 would prob be good ...not sure how thick the ply is.

Why aren't there many biscuit fans? I personally used biscuits with gorilla glue for my sons toddler bed.
 

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Nothing wrong with biscuits. They do not, however, add strength to a joint...they are essentially an aid to alignment. A worthy purpose for sure.

Blue
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
+1 on the biscuits #10 would prob be good ...not sure how thick the ply is.

Why aren't there many biscuit fans? I personally used biscuits with gorilla glue for my sons toddler bed.
The Ply is a full ¾” and I have to learn how to use my biscuit cutter because I don’t even know what a No10 is. The kit came with Biscuits I’m sure there must be a 10 in the selection.

Nothing wrong with biscuits. They do not, however, add strength to a joint...they are essentially an aid to alignment. A worthy purpose for sure.

Blue
Is it because of the type of biscuit? It sure looks like it would add strength to me except that some of the biscuits look a little flimsy like balsa or something. Maybe if I made my own out of hardwood.
 

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My not very quick answer is:

If a indoor wood glue joint falls apart, either joint design or gluing technique needs to be adjusted, or possibly both, even using Elmer's.
 

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Is it because of the type of biscuit? It sure looks like it would add strength to me except that some of the biscuits look a little flimsy like balsa or something. Maybe if I made my own out of hardwood.
IMO, biscuits are junk joinery. If a connection needs a loose tenon (which is what a biscuit is supposed to be), yes, making a hardwood or plywood spline would be a better method. Actually cross grain splines are more predictable.








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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My not very quick answer is:

If a indoor wood glue joint falls apart, either joint design or gluing technique needs to be adjusted, or possibly both, even using Elmer's.
Well I never had this much trouble with glue in the past except if the joint moved before drying. Everything has been tight and clamped at least an hour and I’ll have to check, but I believe the bottle says ½ hr clamping time not sure.

The last thing that fell apart was a simple 90 deg corner that I had clamped for a couple of days and as soon as I removed the clamp and stood it up against the wall the end just fell off. I was intending on drilling screw holes in it later on and only used the glue first to align it before drilling which I wasn’t in a hurry to do at the time.

I was just real surprised because it was a small piece and I’ve torn out the grain trying to break a part other joints.
 
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