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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a new skill saw. I'd like the price under $130. My current one was bought to cut boards for windows for hurricanes.
No particular brand loyalty.

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John
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I'm looking for a new skill saw. I'd like the price under $130. My current one was bought to cut boards for windows for hurricanes.
No particular brand loyalty.

Sent from my iPhone using Wood Forum
Anything you are looking for in particular?? What is wrong with the one you have?

About the only thing I look for in a Circ saw is motor amperage (the bigger the better) and a spindle lock. I hate the ones you need to jam the blade to remove or tighten it. Luckily most of the better names include the feature.
That said, most of the major brands will work for you; deWalt, Milwaukee, Makita, Hitachi, Bosch....... and on and on and on. For price though, I have become a fan of the reconditioned market. Think of used with a warranty. A good portion of my shop is reconditioned and very difficult to tell unless you know where to look for the little "R" brand. Reconditioned sellers also seem to be more sensitive to any issues and seem to show better customer service than straight retailers. I've bought several items from saws to weedeaters from http://www.cpooutlets.com/ and any issues that I have had were always resolved quickly and professionally. Right up to replacing an entire bandsaw.
Here is another recon outlet I have had good luck with http://bigskytool.com/Circular_Saws___c341.aspx
Good Luck :smile:
 

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Woodenboat Builder
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I'm a big fan of the Makita magnesium series. You can grab one up for about $140 which is only slightly outside your preferred price range. They are great saws and the bases are very accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The lack of accuracy on the base & lack of power are the reasons to upgrade.

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Skil Saws

I have to agree the base is the most important part of the saw. A solid aluminum base will slide along a guide board for more accuracy and another thing the thin metal bases tend to climb out of the board you are sawing. Even when you set your saw to the right depth. They are made for light plywood and using a guide board. They still have a habit of riding up on your guide and messing up a piece of ply wood.
I have an old and I mean old Milwaukee saw that weighs a ton. I have had experienced carpenters pick up the saw. They tried it and liked its straight tracking. There complaint is that it was to heavy and wears out a guys arm. Your only having to hang onto the saw and guide it not pick it up and hold it all day is what I told them. Its kind of nice that nobody ever grabs up my saw. You can't find them like that today. This was my fathers saw. I still love it. :yes:
 

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John
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The lack of accuracy on the base & lack of power are the reasons to upgrade.

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Two pretty good reasons to upgrade in my book.:yes:
As has been mentioned, a minimum of 13 amps (many 15 amp machines around now) and a good heavy base. I have an old Milwaukee I bought ca. 1979 that has a heavy aluminum drop foot. Not sure anyone even makes a drop foot anymore. I'm obviously happy with it or I wouldn't still have the thing.
Good luck :smile:
 
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