Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Things ground to a bit of a halt this last week, due to an electrical problem. My combination machine has 3 motors, one each for planer, spindle moulder and saw. Two ran fine when I re-installed it, and one didnt. Every time I tried to start the planer, the electrical supply to the whole property tripped out. I tested for overload and there is no issue, several BIG motors on the same supply worked fine all together, ans on looking closer at the supply board, it was a differential current protector that was tripping the whole thing - so it was an earth leakage problem.

Today I had time to take the machine apart and look for it. Happily, it did not take much finding once the machine was in pieces.

A lost afternoon taking the damn thing apart and putting it back together, especially since there is no way in via access covers etc. you have to take the main chassis apart. Then there is the time taken to align the rip fence etc., when you put it all back, but it's done.

What was the problem ? It took 30 seconds to find it once the machine was opened up - there are two rather crude, almost automotive style connectors that join the electrics of the planer half of the machine to the saw/spindle moulder half.



As you can see in the second photo, they have black plastic hoods covering the cable entry - the fixed part of the connector which is inside the planer chassis is essentially identical. Because the connectors are not fixed in any way, they are just a push fit in the chassis, connecting and disconnecting for the move had moved the body of the connector and where it passes through the chassis of the machine, the black shroud had slipped back (it's only held with a cable tie) and allowed the wires, which had been stripped back far too far, to touch the chassis. Shroud replaced and little wooden wedges added to hold the connectors a bit more firmly in place.



We are back in business !

Next job is to use the planer to prepare the timber for the workbench. Once that is built I can start some real projects !!
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
Thanks for posting. I enjoyed reading on the issue and resolution. :thumbsup:

With electrical issues, it is all too common that a fix takes a fraction of the time than the diagnosis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
<<there are two rather crude, almost automotive style connectors>>

Actually, they are more like many computer type connectors where little vibration is involved. Modern automotive connectors almost always ave at least one latch to keep then in place and sometimes more than one. Much cussing is required to remove some of them.

But I agree that's a poor design for a machine with vibration involved - and even poorer workmanship.

It's great that it was a cheap (though time-consuming) repair!

Bill
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top