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Discussion Starter #21
Ben I think that you have a career in building furniture rather than a carpenter's job. You may have to work as a carpenter or almost anything you can survive on until your "career" gets off the ground. This piece will open some doors for you and make sure take some "show" type photos with good lighting and a suitable background drop curtain or photo studio roll paper.

Market your self on You Tube, make a video, get hits, take orders what ever you can think of. You have real talent and obviously love what you do. You may also try art studios for new commissions and try to get a piece in on consignment. To bad you didn't make 2 of these but knowing how at this point will make the second one easy. Mass has a ton of furniture makers so the competition may be fierce. Try places out of state, Santa Fe comes to mind...lots of money, great art town. I donno. Fine woodworking will publish your photos in the "Readers Gallery" section. See if they will do an article on you. Another place is Woodshop News for personal articles.
Any magazine like Wood, would like a step by step photo array like you have posted here.
Just throwin' out some ideas .....Best to you, :thumbsup: bill
Bill, Thanks a lot for your encouragement. The kind of support that happens in this forum reminds me I'm in the right place doing the right thing. You have some great ideas. I'm going to try everything and see what sticks.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Nice table and great pics! Beautiful wood too. I appreciate seeing your hand drawn designs. Good looking holdfast did you forge it? Keep us posted.
Thanks Mizer! The holdfasts were forged by some fellas up in Gelina Alaska. I had a hard time finding forged holdfasts. For some reason, most everything is cast. These guys do great work and are super cool. I couldn't be happier with them. It took about a month in the humid New England summer for them to season enough to stick like velcro. Now, one whack! Snug hold.

The guy's name is Phil Koontz. I read about him in an issue of Woodworking magazine.

http://www.galenavillageblacksmith.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Very nice. A few of the those cuts definitely look like "head-scratchers", but they came out beautiful. And the curves in the design are perfect.
What finish are you planning for the cherry? I do a bit of cherry and was just interested.
Thank you! I've been doing some tests with new technique for me that I learned watching thewoodwhisperer.com finish a project. The whole piece will get a couple coats of General Finishes Seal a Cell Clear, followed by General Finishes Oil Urethane Top coat. At least that's the plan.

The Maple will get one additional step prior to the above, which I talked about earlier. I'll seal the trans-tint with Bullseye Seal Coat and sand it to remove most of the tint, leaving greater contrast in the figure.
 

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Ben

Beautiful design and superb workmanship. As others have said, look forward to final pictures. I wish you all the best in your "career" pursuit.
 
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Ben that looks great so far. I really like the curve on the tops and bottoms of the legs, very elegant. Good luck with the job search as well.
In your original post you asked a question on how you could attach the bottom but I couldn’t understand what you were asking. Do you have it solved or do you still need help figuring it out?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Ben that looks great so far. I really like the curve on the tops and bottoms of the legs, very elegant. Good luck with the job search as well.
In your original post you asked a question on how you could attach the bottom but I couldn’t understand what you were asking. Do you have it solved or do you still need help figuring it out?
Thanks John! Yes, I'm trying to decide the best way to fasten the bottom to the legs and apron. I want there to be room for the wood to expand without opening the joints of the legs. I thought about putting a cleat on the apron and screwing the cleat into the bottom from underneath. I'm not sure what the traditional solution would be. I'd like to minimize the use of screws, etc.

The other piece of the puzzle is that there will be three separate bays to the cabinet. Two will have cabinet doors and the center will be open on both the front and the back (for audio/video components). I plan to make the separation with two panels.

I've looked for similar construction in numerous books. Most makers would build this type of piece with a carcase type construction or a box. But because the legs carry through the corners from top to bottom on my piece, it's more like a sideboard or a raised buffet (which I've only found diagrams with no bottoms). Any suggestions would be appreciated greatly!!:smile:
 
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Ben I think I understand your dilemma. I applaud your wanting to use actual joinery over the use of fasteners.
First off - are you using sheet goods for the base or are you using solid wood? If you are using sheet goods (Plywood, MDF etc.) then the expansion issue would be minimum. If you are using solid wood then the possible expansion could be considerable (as much as 3/16” to ¼” ) depending on climate conditions.
If your bottom rails are not yet glued and attached to your legs – you could always run a dovetailed groove along the full length of the inside of the rails and in turn make a cleat that has the corresponding dovetail along one long edge. This would achieve a solution that would not be dependent on fasteners.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Ben I think I understand your dilemma. I applaud your wanting to use actual joinery over the use of fasteners.
First off - are you using sheet goods for the base or are you using solid wood? If you are using sheet goods (Plywood, MDF etc.) then the expansion issue would be minimum. If you are using solid wood then the possible expansion could be considerable (as much as 3/16” to ¼” ) depending on climate conditions.
If your bottom rails are not yet glued and attached to your legs – you could always run a dovetailed groove along the full length of the inside of the rails and in turn make a cleat that has the corresponding dovetail along one long edge. This would achieve a solution that would not be dependent on fasteners.
I am using solid wood throughout and the assembly in pictures is just dry fitted. I've yet to glue anything up.

This is helpful! I hadn't thought of a dovetail on the inside of the rails. That's a great idea. So just to clarify, the dovetail groove accepts a tail which runs the length of a cleat? Or do I just cut a tail on the end grain of the bottom material (a glued up Cherry panel in this case)?
 
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See if this explains it a little better. You can then just lay your bottom panel on top of the cleat and as long as you undersize the panel it will expand and contract with no harm done.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Finished

Well I finished my media cabinet. Progress was slow, being the first design and build. Overall, I'm pleased.

All surfaces were hand planed and/or scraped with with a card scraper. I finished it with 2 coats of shellac and 3 coats of oil/urethane.

The top and panels are curly maple, the frame, rails, stiles, legs, bottom, shelves and interior members are cherry. Two interior panels are sugar maple, and the two back panels are sugar maple. No plywood was used. All joints are mortise and tenon.

Thanks for taking a peek!
Ben
 

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