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Woodworking Firefighter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just got my new planer about a week or so ago and love it but just like any other planer I was getting a little bit of snipe with some of the longer boards. Well being the cheap ars that I am and really enjoy making my own stuff, I decided to build my own stand with scrap material that I had laying around my shop. This was my first planer and really haven't been around alot of them so I just took a stab at what I wanted in a planer stand/table. The framing is made from 2+6 and a couple 2+4's. The tops are made from 1/2 MDF (gonna change it to 3/4 though for more support). The way the table works is, there are 4 knobs on each side and under the MDF I put a compression spring between around the 5/16 bolts and MDF. I also installed 4 tubes made from copper (again, scraps laying around) to keep the top in line with the planer. Using the 4 knobs I can adjust the top to get it just perfectly flush/level with the infeed/outfeed of the planer. I sanded the MDF down to 0000 steel wool and coated it with several coats of minwax rub on poly/wax. I have only ran a couple boards through the planer since building the stand but so far it has worked incredible and I haven't gotten any snipe thus far. It particularly comes in really handy with shorter stock b/c you don't have to be on the other side to catch it as it comes out. Yall take a good look at it and tell me if there is anything you would have done different or would change. Thanks, Jeremy
 

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Andrew Close
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280 Posts
nice stand/extension table firefighter. i agree, you probably will want to go with 3/4 MDF since it's a longer-ish run. is the MDF supported by anything other than the springs? i like the adjustability.
 

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Woodworking Firefighter
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513 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks aclose, yeah the MDF does have some additional support underneath it. I ripped some MDF and got it about 1/8" from being flush with the top MDF piece on it. So if the top MDF does sag a bit then it won't sag more than 1/8". So far so good with it, but I will be replacing the MDF soon. Just waitin on Home Depot to throw some scrap pieces in their discount bin.. Yeah, I'm a cheapskate..
 

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Woodworking Firefighter
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513 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Gerry, I really had no idea what the table was suppost to look like really. I just incorporated everything I wanted it to do.
 

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Very nice job on the plainer stand. I only have one thought if I may. You might want to cut some holes or slots in the table on both side of the plainer to let the biuldup of wood chips fall out. Other than that it looks like I built it myself. Another perfict job.:yes:


If I had a hat it would be off to you.
 

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Extraordinaire
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84 Posts
Very nice! Can you separate the top from the stand for storage? I've got a pretty big shop, but like to put things like that away when I'm not using them...
 

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Woodworking Firefighter
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513 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Handyman, I never really thought about cutting holes in the top for chips to fall down but that does sound like a good idea. When I start planning alot of material I might just do that if it becomes an issue. My planer is the dewalt 735 and it really slings the chips out and when I say slings, I mean it shoots them about 10 feet or so and actually feels like tiny bee's stinging you when they hit your skin.

Hack I didn't build it so that the top would come off easily for storage but I suppose it wouldn't be too hard to design it that way if need be. Don't tell my wife though b/c she might want me to make all of my shop stuff able to fold up and be put away so she can park in the garage again.. Jeremy
 

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Hey Firefighter..

Great job on the stand for the planer.. I have to agree as well that the 3/4" MDF is probably a great idea... I am sure that you will get alot of comments about this as it looks very well done...
 

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Thumb Nailer
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What exactly do you mean by "park in the garage?"

Seriously though... Yeah, I like it, but having seen it now, I can see some room for improvement.

#1. Wheels. Two turning casters, and two fixed wheels. Kind of like a shopping cart...

#2. Keep the shelf on the bottom. Keep that to put your planer on when it goes into storage.

#3. Top assembly, perhaps in two smaller panels, that will swing out of the way. That way you can roll it into a corner of the garage...
 

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Woodworking Firefighter
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513 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Duane & dbhost, Yeah, I'm definetly gonna change the MDF to 3/4. I am going to put some casters on it just for the sake of moving this thing around. I like the idea of being able to tuck into a corner when not being used. My thoughts on it were, if I ever decide to make it fold up then I would hing the infeed/outfeed tables and just allow them to drop down and latch onto the frame. My only issue with doing that is that I know it's going to take away from the stability of it. I built a miter saw table one time and did that and after putting the hinges on it, well it just lost alot of lumber support, so I'm kinda nervous about doing that. Any suggestions on how you might do that db?
 

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Thumb Nailer
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I was thinking putting the split directly under the planer itself, and then hinge the halves. Maybe connect the two halves with a throw bolt or something simlar. Or maybe a wooden throw bolt sort of arrangement on the bottom? I thought about what you are saying and yeah, I would think it would lose some stability...

That thing sure is nice though. Heck, even with the solid top, with a set of casters it should just roll out of the way for you. Just stash other stuff under it when stowed and you won't have wasted other space...

Problem with using a suburban garage for a workshop is space is always an issue...
 

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Woodworking Firefighter
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah, I think for now I'm just gonna throw some casters on it and just push it out of the way til I need it. I might even add another shelf to it as well. My wife has already realized that she has lost her parking spot so until we move, it's a dedicated wood shop and junk overflow area..
 

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Extraordinaire
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Lucky man! If I were to boot the wifes car from the garage, that's where I'd be sleeping :blink:

We were very lucky to find a house with an extra large garage, about 900 sq. ft. worth, so I have enough room for both cars, the boat, and a bunch of stuff. I do have to remove at least one car and move the boat to pull out the big power tools...
 

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Woodworking Firefighter
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513 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I wish my garage was 900 sf. Mine is about half that size so both cars, trailer and boat all have to park in the driveway. My home owners ass. loves my house/driveway. I usually get some nasty note once a month from them.
 

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Sawdust Specialist
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Hey Firefighter, very nice extension table. I think I might copy your idea. However, I'm not sure that I understand your table adjustment correctly. Are the table surfaces sitting directly on springs, and you press the table down to the level position using the adjustment knobs?

If this is the case, doesn't the weight of the material you're working on press the tables out of level?
 

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Woodworking Firefighter
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks Thalweg, Thats basically how it works, I'll give ya a step by step on how constructed it. I should have takin some pics during the build of this stand to show you better how it works. I'll try to make since here. Ok what I did was after making the 2+6 framing, I squared and centered the planer on it and bolted it down. Next I cut 2 cross braces to go under the mdf Tops. Next cut the mdf tops to fit inside your opening leaving about 3/16" on each side so that it has room to glid up and down. Next, lay your mdf on the stand exactly where you want it to go and clamp it down. If you're planning on using 5/16 carriage bolts like it did then drill out 1 hole in each corner where you want the adj knobs to go. make sure to drill these holes out 7/16 bit to allow up and down movement. Next I drilled out 4 more holes where you want to put the 4 glider/stabilizer tubes but only drill through the mdf. Next, remove the mdf and put your long carriage bolts through the bottom of your 2+6 framing and add 1 washer, nut and snug it down good. After it's good and tight add 1 washer then the compression spring. I don't actually know the size of the spring but it just large enough to fit around the spring and about an inch long and pretty darn stiff. You need a pretty stiff spring or when you put your lumber on the table it might through it out of flush. Ok so you have the spring on, now add another 5/16 washer and line up the mdf top and slide it over the 4 bolts. Add 5/16 washers to the bolts again and screw on the knobs. Ok, you still have the four larger holes in the mdf for the stablizer tubes. You could use anything really for this I just had some copper lying around so I used that. I just simply measured from the bottom of where the copper would sit on the frame to the top of the table and added a couple inches and cut it and used lag bolts and a washer to hold it down.
 

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that is nice but it will not work on some models because the table moves not the motor like my Jet planer. Unless you could get the whole stand to move with your table. Thanks James
 

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phenolic plywood

Have you thought of using phenolic plywood for the infeed/outfeed beds. I read an article on the FWW website and had to check it out. Went to whitecap and got a 3/4" x 4'x8' sheet for 60.00 with tax. the surface of this stuff is slick, I waxed it up and boards slide across it like an air hockey table:eek: :thumbsup: . Haven't cut it up yet but they say its easy to work with, with sharp blades. If I can ever get to the shop i will let you know how it goes.

Jerry S
 
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