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The Man
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Discussion Starter #1
My band saw has 6 626Z (6mm) roller guide bearings. I noticed they began to roll hard but I did nothing about it because they're tiny little bearings. How expensive could they be?

Try $9 a pop for the low-end variety.

So now that I've spent way too much for a mistake how might I be able to keep the new ones clean and free spinning?
 

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Sawdust Creator
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54 bucks is a cheap lesson!!! I once rebuilt a rear end.....and apparently forgot to recheck the preload on the pinon....100 miles later and a grand of parts......I rebuilt it again......checked the preload twice that time.....
 

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Pain in the A$$
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When I was in the military, I paid one of the base mechanics cash to rebuild my transmission in my car. When I went to pick it up, I asked if everything was good to go and paid him. When I got home (about 6 miles), I smelled something. Apparently I was supposed to put the trans fluid in myself. Fried the dam thing. That was a $250 lesson.

As my dad used to say, "nothing better than a School of Hard Knocks education."
 

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The lesson can be a real cheap one if you've learned something important. I always read tool manuals whenever I get a new tool, even if I already know its' operation and details. I always maintain my tools - none of them have dust or wood resin or any foreign matter build up on them. They are all sharp and many are in better shape then when I bought them. I even keep my workspace and workshop clean.

All these things are not "time consuming" if you develop a routine of checking everything and cleaning up after yourself - at the end of every day. As a mater of fact, the time "spent" maintaining your workshop can be saved with good habits. I never waste time looking for a particular tool and I never waste good wood because a tool was not right.
 

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The Man
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Discussion Starter #5
Well I meant in terms of woodworking... I've made plenty of dumb mistakes in non-woodworking life. Like the time I spent a whole day installing a new garage door opener on a brand new door on a brand new house and forgot to unlock the door before I tested it... or the time I shot the back window out of my Jeep with a BB gun.

That notwithstanding how can I keep the bearings from seizing up again?!
 

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The Man
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Discussion Starter #6
The lesson can be a real cheap one if you've learned something important. I always read tool manuals whenever I get a new tool, even if I already know its' operation and details. I always maintain my tools - none of them have dust or wood resin or any foreign matter build up on them. They are all sharp and many are in better shape then when I bought them. I even keep my workspace and workshop clean.

All these things are not "time consuming" if you develop a routine of checking everything and cleaning up after yourself - at the end of every day. As a mater of fact, the time "spent" maintaining your workshop can be saved with good habits. I never waste time looking for a particular tool and I never waste good wood because a tool was not right.
That's a great point! I really need to get in a better habit of keeping things clean.
 

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Well I meant in terms of woodworking... I've made plenty of dumb mistakes in non-woodworking life. Like the time I spent a whole day installing a new garage door opener on a brand new door on a brand new house and forgot to unlock the door before I tested it... or the time I shot the back window out of my Jeep with a BB gun.

That notwithstanding how can I keep the bearings from seizing up again?!
How about simply oiling them?
 

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When I was in the military, I paid one of the base mechanics cash to rebuild my transmission in my car. When I went to pick it up, I asked if everything was good to go and paid him. When I got home (about 6 miles), I smelled something. Apparently I was supposed to put the trans fluid in myself. Fried the dam thing. That was a $250 lesson.

As my dad used to say, "nothing better than a School of Hard Knocks education."
:eek::eek::eek::eek:

On that one, I'd say the mechanic should have put the fluid in. When I pay people to work on a car I expect it to be immediately drivable when I take possession of it again. Even if this wasn't the case, it should have been thoroughly explained it was on you to put the fluid in.
 

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I don't know about your roller bearings but I just replaced my grizzly 555 with a 10 pack of 608zz, the same it came new with for $10.08 from ebay. That seems high.
 

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That really isn't bad for bearing prices. As for keeping them from seizing, there are really only a few ways to prolong their life. 1 is to buy high quality bearings(not chinese), especially because these are sealed, the lifespan is nearly 100% dependant on initial build quality. The other is to spray them with a light penetrating oil from time to time, and wipe clean(so they don't get all gummed up with sawdust). I actually have a mechanic friend who will remove sealed bearings every few months, and leave them overnight, submerged in an oil bath, then re-install. He swears by it for keeping them tip top.

Other than that, there is not much you can do.
 

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The Man
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Discussion Starter #12
That really isn't bad for bearing prices. As for keeping them from seizing, there are really only a few ways to prolong their life. 1 is to buy high quality bearings(not chinese), especially because these are sealed, the lifespan is nearly 100% dependant on initial build quality. The other is to spray them with a light penetrating oil from time to time, and wipe clean(so they don't get all gummed up with sawdust). I actually have a mechanic friend who will remove sealed bearings every few months, and leave them overnight, submerged in an oil bath, then re-install. He swears by it for keeping them tip top.

Other than that, there is not much you can do.
Well it's way more than I did before! Thank you!
 

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If the bearings are all metal with no plastic or nylon parts at all, then I'd soak them in acetone or something like that. I actually use brake parts cleaner to soak bearings in first, then reoil, then reinstall. This comes from servicing fishing reels and cleaning bearings this way. The cleaner serves to break up gunk that builds up inside them. Afterwards I use compressed air to blow them out and then I let them dry before adding oil.
 
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I agree with the oiling procedure. I usually oil the bearings on my bandsaw at least 3 to 4 times a year, more if I use it more often.
 

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Well I meant in terms of woodworking... I've made plenty of dumb mistakes in non-woodworking life. Like the time I spent a whole day installing a new garage door opener on a brand new door on a brand new house and forgot to unlock the door before I tested it... or the time I shot the back window out of my Jeep with a BB gun.

That notwithstanding how can I keep the bearings from seizing up again?!
my beiring's on my 12" delta with riser kit , they are sealed and need nothing but blowing dust off now and than, but when they get a little hard to turn replace them , thay are cheep if you get them at the right place, i didn't read any other post so their may be another post , that says to get sealed type
 

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I may start trying to do once every couple of months. My band saw gets a lot of hours on it
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