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Is one really saving any effort and money doing pine-on-osb doors verses making a hardwood door?
It's the style he was after. If you make a hardwood door, you'll have typical frame and panel construction. Which is fine, but a different style than the reclaimed lumber on a diagonal.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Next time - do both sides at the same time and don't use OSB. Currently, assuming the uninstalled lumber has been stored with the current panel, I'd do what you can to flatten out the existing panel with clamps. Let it set up overnight. Sometimes you can get back what you need. OSB tends to hold a curve well so it may do what you need. Once flat, I'd move forward with the install of the other side. If you're pressed for time, I'd clamp it slightly bowed the opposite direction and install as much wood as possible before removing the clamps. You're essentially installing the wood under tension and hoping that when it's released it will help hold its shape. Obviously riskier that way but sometimes you've gotta do what you've gotta do.

Looking forward to the finished pics.
I have it clamped up flat right now. Plan to leave it for a couple of nights and glue/nail the side with clamps on, or at least as much as I can nail.

The glue you are using can easily cause warpage too. Normal wood glues take a long time to fully cure. When laminating something like the door it would work better to use a resin glue. A resin glue has a hardening agent that will dry throughout the glue up. In order to use wood glue you might have to keep a door like that clamped flat for a week or more.

I also agree with woodenthings in that whatever you do to one side you do the same to the other side. If wood was laminated to the other side and clamped flat for a week I think you might have a chance of salvaging the door.
I used PL premium Construction adhesive as it had a 24 hour fully dry time. The resin glue was to expensive for such a large application.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Is one really saving any effort and money doing pine-on-osb doors verses making a hardwood door?
I only used the osb to have an attachment site for the pine and reclaimed wood. Myg GF wanted one side pine with a 45 degree angle slope upwards and the opposite side with a chevron pattern with reclaimed wood. What is your thought process?
 

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I have it clamped up flat right now. Plan to leave it for a couple of nights and glue/nail the side with clamps on, or at least as much as I can nail.



I used PL premium Construction adhesive as it had a 24 hour fully dry time. The resin glue was to expensive for such a large application.
Oh boy, the construction adhesive really never hardens. It will remain flexible enough it may go back and forth between being flat and warped. I'm not sure what would be a fix at this point. It's uncharted waters. Maybe if you are going to laminate the other side put a bunch of screws into the other side first. I would stop using the construction adhesive. If you aren't going to use a resin glue then use wood glue and clamp it to a flat surface for a week.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Oh boy, the construction adhesive really never hardens. It will remain flexible enough it may go back and forth between being flat and warped. I'm not sure what would be a fix at this point. It's uncharted waters. Maybe if you are going to laminate the other side put a bunch of screws into the other side first. I would stop using the construction adhesive. If you aren't going to use a resin glue then use wood glue and clamp it to a flat surface for a week.
I thought construction adhesive would work better than wood glue in terms of water from the glue damaging the OSB? As it stands right now, I have the pine screwed to the OSB with construction adhesive.

I am basically following this guys plan, but I'm using different wood and different lay out for the wood:


I will also be adding the metal edging, which I believe will help with the warping as well?
 

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I thought construction adhesive would work better than wood glue in terms of water from the glue damaging the OSB? As it stands right now, I have the pine screwed to the OSB with construction adhesive.

I am basically following this guys plan, but I'm using different wood and different lay out for the wood:

How to Make a Sliding Barn Door - YouTube

I will also be adding the metal edging, which I believe will help with the warping as well?
It's pretty difficult to damage OSB with water. It's made for sheathing and roofs of houses which often get rained on before being properly covered.

The construction adhesive is mainly used to lay OSB subfloor. It's only purpose there is to be enough of an adhesive to keep the floor from creaking when you walk on it. it's not enough of an adhesive to be used to laminate with. You won't find anything manufactured using this adhesive. If you have some that has dried feel how gummy it is where wood glue gets really hard. The hardness is what is needed to make something like your door rigid enough to resist wood movement.

The metal edge might save the day. How thick is the steel? If it's 1/8" or more that should do it. You might lay the door out on horses and put a weight in the middle of it and see if you can bend it a little in the opposite direction for a couple days. The closer you have it to flat when you apply the steel the better.
 

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I thought construction adhesive would work better than wood glue in terms of water from the glue damaging the OSB? As it stands right now, I have the pine screwed to the OSB with construction adhesive.

I am basically following this guys plan, but I'm using different wood and different lay out for the wood:

How to Make a Sliding Barn Door - YouTube

I will also be adding the metal edging, which I believe will help with the warping as well?
Looks like the guy in the video used 3/4" OSB, still not a great material, but the thicker product is going to resist moving more than the 1/4" or 3/8" product you used.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
It's pretty difficult to damage OSB with water. It's made for sheathing and roofs of houses which often get rained on before being properly covered.

The construction adhesive is mainly used to lay OSB subfloor. It's only purpose there is to be enough of an adhesive to keep the floor from creaking when you walk on it. it's not enough of an adhesive to be used to laminate with. You won't find anything manufactured using this adhesive. If you have some that has dried feel how gummy it is where wood glue gets really hard. The hardness is what is needed to make something like your door rigid enough to resist wood movement.

The metal edge might save the day. How thick is the steel? If it's 1/8" or more that should do it. You might lay the door out on horses and put a weight in the middle of it and see if you can bend it a little in the opposite direction for a couple days. The closer you have it to flat when you apply the steel the better.
Wow, I thought construction adhesive was stronger than wood glue... guess not. Would a gorilla glue work or what do you recommend?

The metal is 1/8 thick.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Looks like the guy in the video used 3/4" OSB, still not a great material, but the thicker product is going to resist moving more than the 1/4" or 3/8" product you used.
Yeah, I used 1/2 inch OSB. I should have just followed with my gut and spent extra on the 3/4 birch ply....
 

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It's the style he was after. If you make a hardwood door, you'll have typical frame and panel construction. Which is fine, but a different style than the reclaimed lumber on a diagonal.
Good point

I only used the osb to have an attachment site for the pine and reclaimed wood. Myg GF wanted one side pine with a 45 degree angle slope upwards and the opposite side with a chevron pattern with reclaimed wood. What is your thought process?
Honestly, not sure what the best way to approach this. I'm half tempted to use a thin MDF core plywood and resin to attach the pine to the plywood....or as somebody else mentioned, attach pine to both sides and use a thinner plywood along with resin.
 

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The PL adhesive is plenty strong for the application at hand. You'll be fine. It wouldn't have mattered if you had used a resin type of adhesive with 100% coverage, the panel would still warp unless it is balanced.

You say you currently have it clamped flat. I would recommend clamping it past flat and putting an opposite bow in it about double the amount of the initial bow. For example, if you could take a straight edge from top to bottom on your door and there was a half inch gap in the middle, then lay your door upside down on a long work bench, place a 1" shim in the middle, and then clamp the ends down.
 

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Wow, I thought construction adhesive was stronger than wood glue... guess not. Would a gorilla glue work or what do you recommend?

The metal is 1/8 thick.
The Gorilla wood glue would be fine but if you mean the foaming polyurethane glue that isn't. It's better than the construction adhesive but isn't suitable for that project.

I still think the 1/8" steel will save the day, just try to make the door flat before mounting it. The steel may bow if you use it to force the door flat where if it were flat to begin with would maintain it well.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
The PL adhesive is plenty strong for the application at hand. You'll be fine. It wouldn't have mattered if you had used a resin type of adhesive with 100% coverage, the panel would still warp unless it is balanced.

You say you currently have it clamped flat. I would recommend clamping it past flat and putting an opposite bow in it about double the amount of the initial bow. For example, if you could take a straight edge from top to bottom on your door and there was a half inch gap in the middle, then lay your door upside down on a long work bench, place a 1" shim in the middle, and then clamp the ends down.
I thought PL Premium would be strong enough well. I bought some Titebond 3 just in case though. How long would you clamp it in the opposite way for?

The Gorilla wood glue would be fine but if you mean the foaming polyurethane glue that isn't. It's better than the construction adhesive but isn't suitable for that project.

I still think the 1/8" steel will save the day, just try to make the door flat before mounting it. The steel may bow if you use it to force the door flat where if it were flat to begin with would maintain it well.
its the foaming poly glue. I think the steel will be my best friend as well....Will be sure to clamp it flat upon steel addition.
 

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Give it a night then unclamp it and check. Longer if necessary. After 3 or 4 days if it hasn't moved it probably isn't going to. At that point I'd look at taking it in to a climate controlled location to see if you can drop the moisture content a bit and bow it back the other way.
 

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In case you guys were wondering on the build.

I clamped the OSB/Pine in the opposite direction of the bow/cup for 48 hours. After I unclamped it, the OSB/pine was flat at the ends, but still had a very slight twist to it lengthwise. I put some weight on the corners which brought the twist out. With the weights still on the board, I glue/nailed the reclaimed wood to the OSB. I have it clamped up with some jointed flat 2x4s right now, so its as level as it can get. Will buy the 1/8 or 3/16 metal edging this week.

Here is how it stands right now.
 

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Hi everyone!
I love the idea as well and it can be great for a bathroom. Top-quality marine plywood will serve you long and effectively even in such a moisture-conditioned area as a bathroom and you and your GF will love the look for sure!
Good luck!
 

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not for this project

Hi everyone!
I love the idea as well and it can be great for a bathroom. Top-quality marine plywood will serve you long and effectively even in such a moisture-conditioned area as a bathroom and you and your GF will love the look for sure!
Good luck!
You can't get marine plywood in herringbone pattern which is the desired look. :|
 
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