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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just so we are clear, I really don't know what I'm doing only an idea and lots of YouTube videos. :yes:

So I disassembled my Bed Rock and cleaned it all up. It had minimum rust and I wasn’t going to dip it, but since I already had a jug of Evapo Rust I put some small parts in an empty water bottle just see what happens with small parts and I really was surprised. I also found out you cannot reuse the stuff because it doesn’t work a second time. The photo below is before cleaned with Evapo Rust.



I wanted to try flattening it and remove some scratches on the right side of the sole so I bought a 36-in x 3-in Natural Marble Threshold Tile from Lowe's for under $20.



I couldn’t find any long sandpaper and then it was suggested by Tom King that I could use glue down short sheets. Then I saw a Youtube video using the same method and decide to do that.

I was working up in the wilderness all day and probably the rest of the week and I could not get to a HF store so I stopped at an Auto Zone on my way home and picked up sand paper with spray adhesive.

I hope I bought the correct stuff because it was pretty expensive and if not then I need to return it.

 

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How bad is the sole of the plane?

The reason I ask is I don't think you'll need the 80 unless it's really messed up. I usually only go down to 220 and then polish a little with 400.

Remember, you don't need every square inch of the sole to be flat - you'll go insane and broke trying to get it that way.

Mark up the bottom of the plane with a black marker and then make a few passes on the 180 grit to get an idea on how much you'll have to remove. If not too much, continue using the 180 and return the 80 to save a little money.

Getting a roll or two of paper off the internet is the way to go, you'll spend almost as much buying those little packs as you will on a 10m roll from Klingspor's.
 

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Good start.

The marble tile will be useful, not only for the restoration. I used a similar long flat reference surface to sand pieces for gluing which are too small for jointing.

I use 80 grit to start the sole flattening, and do not go above 120, but you can use your 180.

I use 180 or 220 on the sides, mostly so the scratches are smaller.

I use 400 as one of the grits to sharpen the blade. Where I start depends on if I am removing metal, 80 grit, or sharpening a dull, but good edge, 150 grit.

I go up to 2400 on my abrasives. I know some folks go to very high grits on the water stones. Personal preference.
 

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Good start.

The marble tile will be useful, not only for the restoration. I used a similar long flat reference surface to sand pieces for gluing which are too small for jointing.

I use 80 grit to start the sole flattening, and do not go above 120, but you can use your 180.

I use 180 or 220 on the sides, mostly so the scratches are smaller.

I use 400 as one of the grits to sharpen the blade. Where I start depends on if I am removing metal, 80 grit, or sharpening a dull, but good edge, 150 grit.

I go up to 2400 on my abrasives. I know some folks go to very high grits on the water stones. Personal preference.
:laughing::laughing:

Not laughing at you Dave, just laughing at the constant "differences" that everybody has in how they do things when restoring old tools.:smile:

I understand the confusion that many people encounter when they start learning to restore things. So much seemingly contradictory advise!

Bottom line, do what seems to work for you and don't worry too much if it matches what everyone else is doing.

Start with the 180 and see how it works since it's the one in the middle of the grits you have.

If it isn't working fast enough for you, use the course paper. If it's working fine, great.

If you like the look using only the one grit stop there.

If you want a more polished look go to a higher grit.

The grit you stop at will not affect performance of the plane, just the looks of it, so do what makes you happy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How bad is the sole of the plane?

The reason I ask is I don't think you'll need the 80 unless it's really messed up. I usually only go down to 220 and then polish a little with 400.
You know I haven't even tried to use a straight edge on it yet so i don't know if it even needs it. I'm more into making it look nice. but maybe i should check it with the straight first.

I was a little concerned about the 80, but in this video the guy uses 60 and I also saw some other videos with 80.

 

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Flattening is two dimensions, front to back and side to side.

My longer planes tend to have more issues front to back.

My shorter planes tend to have more issues side to side. I think this may be due to having a lot more use over the decades. The soles have a characteristic wear in the middle from so much use on edges of boards.

The important aspect is for the mouth to be flat on front and back, and side to side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm still a little confused about the sandpaper. Should I be using wet paper? I don’t know what is wet paper at Klingspor's and it looks like all of it is dry for wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’ve decided to take all this stuff from Auto Zone back. If I don’t need wet sandpaper then I already have regular paper backed sandpaper up to 220. I was hoping to get started tonight, I guess I’ll wait.


I just got caught up in the video using the spray simple green as a cutting fluid and thought it looked really cool. So I got to rethink this.
 

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I use WD40 as a cutting fluid after someone else on here suggested it... it certainly cut down on how fast I was using up the sandpaper, and I suppose I enjoy the smell for some reason.
 

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I’ve decided to take all this stuff from Auto Zone back. If I don’t need wet sandpaper then I already have regular paper backed sandpaper up to 220. I was hoping to get started tonight, I guess I’ll wait.


I just got caught up in the video using the spray simple green as a cutting fluid and thought it looked really cool. So I got to rethink this.
I use the wet/dry sandpaper to sharpen my irons on, works great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
...... I suppose I enjoy the smell for some reason.
LOL, I had a coworker that liked it so much that he used it to clean his work bench and then his hands. :eek:
 
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