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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, up till now, my plane collection has been whatever I find that I can use, and hasn't included any Stanley Bailey planes. Yesterday, my roommate and I went to the local dirt malls to get out of the house(it's cold in Kentucky this year), and I found a No. 5 almost immediately. Based on what I'd read prior to this, it's from between 1907 and 1910. There are only two patent dates, and the blade sports the Stanley Rule and Level marking. No marking on the cap. It's not in teribble shape(some surface rust, iron is good), but the japanning has seen better days. So, my question is this, and is directed at the purists out there: is it sacrelige to remove the rest of the beat japanning and replace with enamel? Should I just clean it up, tune it, sharpen it and go? It will be a user, but much like the machinery that I restore, I want it to look flawless. It's silly, I know, but it's a compulsion. Anyway, I really like the feel of this thing(tote and knob are in great shape), and I've got several bench and table projects going that are going to get very familiar with Mr. Stanley soon enough. Thanks everyone.

WCT
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys! Looks like it was about what I thought. I like my stuff to be as original as possible, but when paint is 50% or more gone, it drives me nuts. I've got some Rustoleum Pro enamel in gloss black that should be an acceptable substitute. I'll post pics as soon as I get home. It's a nice looking plane, aside from all the grime and surface rust.

WCT
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Awesome plane, Paul. That's been my method in the past with several Millers Falls, and a few clones. You can't see it in the picture, but there are massive, visible holes in the japanning. I won't know how bad until I get the gunk off, but I'll post another pic. Heck, maybe I'll get lucky! Thanks!

WCT
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
You guys have got me super excited to get home from work tonight. Dinner will have to wait; I want to see what's under all that dirt and grime. Dave, that Sargent is one seriously beautiful tool. I had a similar experience with a Millers Falls No. 900B.

I, too enjoy pondering an old tool's history. I suppose that's why I have mostly old stuff; it makes me happy. I'll do my best to document this plane as I clean it up, and whatever else. Wish me luck!

WCT

Aforementioned Millers Falls 900B
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Don- Wow. That's all I can really say. Your restorations are gorgeous, and your collection is incredible. I have a small collection of Ohio Tools wooden planes("coffin" smoother, jack), but aside from cleaning up the irons, I really didn't know how to approach them. The coffin is brittle and weak, and needs a new body. The jack is in decent shape, sans knob. Should I just clean them up, flatten the sole, straighten the mouth, oil them up and go? Never done a wooden plane restore, so it's Greek to me.

WCT
 
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