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Discussion Starter #1
So, up till now, my plane collection has been whatever I find that I can use, and hasn't included any Stanley Bailey planes. Yesterday, my roommate and I went to the local dirt malls to get out of the house(it's cold in Kentucky this year), and I found a No. 5 almost immediately. Based on what I'd read prior to this, it's from between 1907 and 1910. There are only two patent dates, and the blade sports the Stanley Rule and Level marking. No marking on the cap. It's not in teribble shape(some surface rust, iron is good), but the japanning has seen better days. So, my question is this, and is directed at the purists out there: is it sacrelige to remove the rest of the beat japanning and replace with enamel? Should I just clean it up, tune it, sharpen it and go? It will be a user, but much like the machinery that I restore, I want it to look flawless. It's silly, I know, but it's a compulsion. Anyway, I really like the feel of this thing(tote and knob are in great shape), and I've got several bench and table projects going that are going to get very familiar with Mr. Stanley soon enough. Thanks everyone.

WCT
 

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If a lot of the japanning is missing, I'll use a chemical stripper & wire brush to remove the rest, and repaint with engine enamel.
 

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It is your decision whether you want to always see the remnants of the original jappaning, or to remove and repaint.

For my plane restorations, if too much of the original jappaning has gone, which is common, I use chemical stripper, then scrap off the old paint and re-paint with engine enamel.

How about posting some pictures of the plane.
 

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I agree with what others have said, if most is gone anyway and its going to be a user then just strip the rest and re-enamel it. Sharpen that blade, tune it and go to town.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys! Looks like it was about what I thought. I like my stuff to be as original as possible, but when paint is 50% or more gone, it drives me nuts. I've got some Rustoleum Pro enamel in gloss black that should be an acceptable substitute. I'll post pics as soon as I get home. It's a nice looking plane, aside from all the grime and surface rust.

WCT
 

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I would get it cleaned up first and see how bad it really is.

Here are a couple of shots of a Stanley Bailey No5, type 11, I got for $2 at a flea market. Looks pretty good for 100 years old. I used warm soapy water to clean it and then a soak in Evaporust. The metal grayed a bit, but I think it would have come off with some light sanding. I just sharpened it since it is a user plane.

The actual restore thread is here http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/2-bailey-no5-score-plus-evapo-rust-props-40222/

Before cleaning and a soak in Evapo-Rust. That stuff works miracles.
Image uploading. Refresh page to view


After cleaning, waxing, handle fixing.


 

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Discussion Starter #8
Awesome plane, Paul. That's been my method in the past with several Millers Falls, and a few clones. You can't see it in the picture, but there are massive, visible holes in the japanning. I won't know how bad until I get the gunk off, but I'll post another pic. Heck, maybe I'll get lucky! Thanks!

WCT
 

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Nicely done Paul,

Like Dave wrote
It is your decision whether you want to always see the remnants of the original jappaning, or to remove and repaint.
I myself try to keep the original japanning, but if the loss is to great, then I will repaint, I only have a few like that.
It a great feeling when you clean or restore a tool to what it looked like, when it was new. I cant help sometimes to hold it and dream of who held it and used it before, or what it help build....guess I am just weird...

Here is a pic of a cheap clone of a Stanley...turned out to a pretty good user.
 

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Its not weird Acowboy, I think the same thing when buying or using an old plane. What did this tool help build in its long life? What kind of person used it? Does it have magical powers that will turn me into a master craftsman if I rub it three times? Well maybe not the last one.
 

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Awesome plane, Paul. That's been my method in the past with several Millers Falls, and a few clones. You can't see it in the picture, but there are massive, visible holes in the japanning. I won't know how bad until I get the gunk off, but I'll post another pic. Heck, maybe I'll get lucky! Thanks!
Sometimes we do get lucky.

This was my second round of rust bucket restorations.

A Sargent 408, equivalent to Stanley No. 3

The as-purchased picture. I got this from a nearby flea market.




The after restoration. I was amazed that the original paint was in such good condition. I did replace the knob and tote. They were not broken, but not the best woods.



The restoration thread if you want to read more. This is perhaps my favourite restoration based on how it looked at the start and how it looks now.

Edit, restoration thread.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/latest-rust-bucket-planes-46494/
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
You guys have got me super excited to get home from work tonight. Dinner will have to wait; I want to see what's under all that dirt and grime. Dave, that Sargent is one seriously beautiful tool. I had a similar experience with a Millers Falls No. 900B.

I, too enjoy pondering an old tool's history. I suppose that's why I have mostly old stuff; it makes me happy. I'll do my best to document this plane as I clean it up, and whatever else. Wish me luck!

WCT

Aforementioned Millers Falls 900B
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Don- Wow. That's all I can really say. Your restorations are gorgeous, and your collection is incredible. I have a small collection of Ohio Tools wooden planes("coffin" smoother, jack), but aside from cleaning up the irons, I really didn't know how to approach them. The coffin is brittle and weak, and needs a new body. The jack is in decent shape, sans knob. Should I just clean them up, flatten the sole, straighten the mouth, oil them up and go? Never done a wooden plane restore, so it's Greek to me.

WCT
 
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