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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Continued.... It's glued and screwed. I plan on adding drawers and cubby holes for different things thats why I didn't add a bottom. The MDF top is held on with pocket holes. Worked very nice. I think I can get away with Polyurethane for the top. The 4 locking casters work great but even when their locked, it rocks a bit side to side but still solid.

All in all I like it. It will prove to be a great addition to my shop. Input is welcome. Will be posting more pics as I add to it.
 

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Nice job! I was just trying to plan for a new 8' work table... Think I found what I'm look for, thanks. One question, do you think adding a 4x8 sheet on the bottom for a held would make it sturdier where it wouldn't wiggle as much?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The wiggle is strictly related to the casters. Because they are all the 360 degree casters. Other than that, it is very sturdy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One thing I found out is I have to add casters in the center on each side. Worried about it sagging over time.

I also would have went with the double locking casters. That would've taken care of the wiggle related to the casters. I spent 5 dollars each on the casters and good ones are about 12. And the better ones have an extra 1/2 inch in height so if I ever have to replace them, they will make the work bench too tall for an outfeed table. Oh well lesson learned.
 

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Looks nice. I have a 4x8 table behind my TS too but is is solid without castors. Personally I don't think I would like the castors; one for the reason you mentioned that it moves a little, but also because I like to be able to lean or pound on the table for working.

Here is a shot of the old table I built years ago. I made 4x4 legs out of 2x4's and bolted them to an apron of plywood. It doesn't show too well here though.


All around it is a great idea, I love a 4x8 horizontal clutter magnet behind the saw too.
 

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One thing I found out is I have to add casters in the center on each side. Worried about it sagging over time.

I also would have went with the double locking casters. That would've taken care of the wiggle related to the casters. I spent 5 dollars each on the casters and good ones are about 12. And the better ones have an extra 1/2 inch in height so if I ever have to replace them, they will make the work bench too tall for an outfeed table. Oh well lesson learned.
Don't let that deter you if that's what you want to do. I bet you could find a half-inch of clearance with a router. Might have to add some additional support over the caster, but it could be done.
 

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Hey dwendt,
Check out this work table that Norm made. It has a pretty unique and simple solution for the casters. They easily lift off the floor when not in use makin the table much sturdier.

http://www.newyankee.com/index.php?id=53#ecwid:category=1855062&mode=product&product=7916621

You can actualy see how they work just by lookin at the add for the plans. The string is to lift the hinged supports that lock the board with the casters in place.
This is a great idea on how to deal with the castors and yet have it solid to the floor. Thanks Jim.
 

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Continued.... It's glued and screwed. I plan on adding drawers and cubby holes for different things thats why I didn't add a bottom. The MDF top is held on with pocket holes. Worked very nice. I think I can get away with Polyurethane for the top. The 4 locking casters work great but even when their locked, it rocks a bit side to side but still solid.

All in all I like it. It will prove to be a great addition to my shop. Input is welcome. Will be posting more pics as I add to it.
Man, that looks surprisingly familiar. The top of mine is a 4x8 sheet of hardboard that just drops into the frame. I figure that should make it easy to replace once I have a sufficient number of holes, paint spills, glue drops, etc. on it. I also added a full bottom shelf. The bottom shelf is amazingly useful to store stuff when I'm waiting on glue-ups to dry, etc. To finish it off, I built leveling feet using long bolts, t-nuts, and some 4x4 scrap, since my shop floor is decidedly not flat.

Even the saw looks familiar!

Nice work!


Outfeed.jpg

Jonathan
 

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Nice out-feed table. I do think you ought to add a plywood bottom though. And maybe add support blocks to make the caster mounts a bit more substantial. Though can't criticize too much. I still haven't made out-feed support at all for mine. I'm still using roller stands, which leave a LOT to be desired.

The table should come in very handy and make using the table saw a bit more safe. Nice work. :thumbsup:

I'm surprised to see how many of us have the Ridgid R4512 (the original poster, you, myself and quite a few others here at the forum). It's a great saw for a great price.
 

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first of all, great job on the table. Looks like that will definitely give you alot more fabrication space, or clutter space, if you will.....

One thing I found out is I have to add casters in the center on each side. Worried about it sagging over time.

I also would have went with the double locking casters. That would've taken care of the wiggle related to the casters. I spent 5 dollars each on the casters and good ones are about 12. And the better ones have an extra 1/2 inch in height so if I ever have to replace them, they will make the work bench too tall for an outfeed table. Oh well lesson learned.
Don't let that deter you if that's what you want to do. I bet you could find a half-inch of clearance with a router. Might have to add some additional support over the caster, but it could be done.
+1 to Cocheseuga thoughts. If your caster brackets are glued on, You could always flip your table over, shave off 1/2" off your caster bracket with a router, and put the new casters on. To do this, you could just put a couple of 2x4s next to the caster brackets, and make a router sled to do it accurately. If you do this, make sure to take the screws out of your corner supports (caster bracket), so that there is no metal while routing.... If your caster brackets aren't glued on, just take them off, sandwich 2 pieces of 1/2" plywood together, in the and mount the casters to that.

In either case mentioned above, you could add more caster support by putting a triangular brace in above the caster bracket.

IMO, I would change out the casters, because I know all to well, that if I don't do something right, that it will eat at me till I end up fixing it. and now would be the time to do it, while it is still relatively lightweight, without all of the drawers and what not you are planning on adding.

Fabian
 

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looks great - but in my shop I call it a horizontal clutter magnet - lol

ha ha, mine too, everything my bride doesn't want in the house her or the kids pack it down to the shop and set it somewhere, then she comes down and says "Looks like you need to clean this place up"
 

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I'm surprised to see how many of us have the Ridgid R4512 (the original poster, you, myself and quite a few others here at the forum). It's a great saw for a great price.
I've only had mine for a couple of months (which is why it's so clean and unscratched in the picture), but I purchased it in large part because of how many of them I saw on this forum.

Jonathan
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the comments and suggestions. It's working out great so far. I've started adding shelves to the bottom. They are osb, because I had it laying around. Not screwed down so I might replace it as it's one of those things that might eat at me if I don't.
 
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