Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am making flooring out of my oversupply of red oak I have. I like the contrast in the grain using Dark Walnut Watco Oil. The problem is the overpowering red in the wood. Even the Black Walnut Watco leaves the wood with a red tint. I need to get to closer to a black/grey shade rather than brown/red.
1) Is there a way to minimize the red?
2) Can I use an oil stain such as Varathane Espresso to tint Neutral Color Watco Oil?
Lucky
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
I need to get to closer to a black/grey shade rather than brown/red.
Lucky

WELCOME TO THE FORUM

You might experiment with samples, but mix up a wash of white and black tint or oil base paint, into a clear varnish and mineral spirits, and BLO.

Start with very weak ratios to see the color. Add about 5% BLO just to extend the dry time a bit. About 10% each of a white and black each, and about 20% varnish, with about 60%-75% mineral spirits. The mix percentages are to volume, not to each other. When testing, you might see if the white, or the black should be increased.

I make up pickling mixes this way, and it may give you what you want. Take a close sample and apply the final finish, as that will also change the color.

This might work out OK for you...after all, your name is Lucky.:smile:










.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
I have never found the red in red oak to be an issue, once finished. It seems to disappear, at least for me. I did a floor once mixing red and white oak, after finishing, you could not tell which was which.......well, I could, but the lay person(the person laying on the floor!!) couldn't.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,567 Posts
Blockers

In the refinishing world, these color tints are referred to as 'Blockers' because they block colors.
The same color charts were used and still are used on inexpensive furniture. Anyone that has ever stripped the less expensive "mahogany" depression era tables will notice that the stripped wood is covered in red dye. The manufacturer would use a black paste wood grain filler and then spray the entire surface with a red analine dye. and then clear coat it. Your eye would see the combo of red and black as a red mahogany color. Then they would pack on the glaze and lacquer tints to get it the way they wanted it.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top