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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Even with a ledger board , you want to use sticks. It will help hold the weight while your screwing the cabinets in..
“sticks’, you are referring to support for the front of the cabinets?
This project is for the future, so the possible date is not set.
Yes, uppers first always, and yes we will be getting a counter, style/material we don’t know yet.
 

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I would already have these cabinets hung..We just screw to the metal stubs on commercial. You can feel a metal stud when you screw into it.

As your putting the correct screw in , you will feel a resistance and often will push your cabinet off the wall as the screw starts to thread , then it will pull tight. The problem with most is trying to torque the screw..If you predrill the cabinet before you insert the screw , you won’t feel the cabinet resist, but you will befell the cabinet draw tight..

I hound have taken pictures of a commercial install back in the day..
I would never consider screwing any cabinet directly to any stud lighter than 18 gauge. With light gauge metal we will try to add bracing to help control the metal studs deflection.
 

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It seems this is a good method, which I also mentioned 😁. I also mentioned something about load forces.

But rather than word of mouth, I think this could be easily researched, maybe even a call or visit to a local cabinet shop?

I‘m also not totally getting the metal and glue, but apparently it works.
I used to work for a company which made cabinets for doctors offices which were nearly always metal buildings with metal studs. The cabinets were built out of melamine and done with french cleats and the installers mounted the cleats on the walls with toggle bolts. This company was in business for a long time. I don't think they could have survived if some of the cabinets came off the wall.
 

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It seems this is a good method, which I also mentioned 😁. I also mentioned something about load forces.

But rather than word of mouth, I think this could be easily researched, maybe even a call or visit to a local cabinet shop?

I‘m also not totally getting the metal and glue, but apparently it works.
Sometimes size and location of cabinet can make it difficult to install. Let’s say the opposite side of the wall has plumbing. A lot of times your side will be marked in red in a certain area. You’ll have to use liquid nail and screw the cabinet to the left and right cabinet. Sometimes it’s the end of a run and you only have one cabinet to fasten too..
 

· mike44
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Mike, looks like a great idea, but isn’t that just screwing the cabinets to a glued on piece of sheet metal?
Where you state ‘cut strip of metal to length’, is that a strip PER cabinet or a long length to span all the cabinets?
Doesn’t that cause the cabinets to pitch forward slightly from the top, and leave a gap between the cabinet and the back wall?
Please understand I’m not being critical, just looking for more info.
Yes, the cabinets are screwed on to the metal, but the metal will not come off if installed with subfloor adhesive or a PL product . That is why i said wait til the next day. I can install the cabinets the same day but since you haven't done this before i recommend waiting til the adhesive dries. As far as the length goes, makes no difference if the metal is a single length or cut to the cabinet width. The metal is installed at both the top and bottom, no pitch forward.
If there is any thing else I can help with, just ask.
mike
 

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Those snap toggles do NOT attach to the metal studs, but through a 1/2" hole in the drywall itself according to the video. They will work in any wall where there is enough depth to insert them and snap off the plastic straps. No wood blocking is required. The time to put in blocking is before the drywall goes on, as you and most folks know.
I would not be comfortable trusting screws in metal studs. It would probably be fine, but I would obsess about it afterwards. I would mark out the area to be covered by wall cabinets, remove drywall leaving a 1" margin to cover my work and screw wood studs to metal studs. At edges, where there are no studs, slip in 2x4 blocks and screw through drywall. Cover area of bare studs and blocking with 1/2 inch plywood, screwing to both wood and metal. When you hang cabinets, you will have a unified area of wood and metal tied together by plywood. Screws into wood blocking will provide solid support.
 
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