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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks, hope I‘m in the right spot. I want to hang some kitchen cabinets on an existing drywall/metal stud wall, however, I think I should install 2x6 blocking to attach the cabinets. I don’t trust direct fastening to the metal studs themselves.
I was wondering if anyone had any advice for installing wood blocking in an existing wall, short of ripping all the drywall down?
thanks!
 

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Be no different than mounting the cabinets to the metal studs. Unless you get behind the sheet rock..

When I’m in doubt, I’ll put some liquid nail on the backs along with the screws..
 

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Just remove rock, and screw studs to existing studs and replace sheet rock. Normally in a commercial building the GC will mount plywood to the studs before rocking…

you could just remove what’s needed to place the cabinets directly ove4 it with 1/2 ply, You’ll probably have tile in between anyway..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just remove rock, and screw studs to existing studs and replace sheet rock. Normally in a commercial building the GC will mount plywood to the studs before rocking…
you could just remove what’s needed to place the cabinets directly ove4 it with 1/2 ply, You’ll probably have tile in between anyway..
Pardon my extra question, but in what direction are you putting the wood? I was going to install the 2x6 blocking flat, horizontally at the level of the cabinet tops. I don’t trust using plywood only.
 

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I believe there are special screws for mounting to metal studs.
Those snap toggles do NOT attach to the metal studs, but through a 1/2" hole in the drywall itself according to the video.
They will work in any wall where there is enough depth to insert them and snap off the plastic straps.
No wood blocking is required. The time to put in blocking is before the drywall goes on, as you and most folks know.
 

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Those snap toggles do NOT attach to the metal studs, but through a 1/2" hole in the drywall itself according to the video.
They will work in any wall where there is enough depth to insert them and snap off the plastic straps.
No wood blocking is required. The time to put in blocking is before the drywall goes on, as you and most folks know.
Sorry I guess that was misleading, I was just illustrating the type anchor used, WNT.

The hole goes through the metal stud. He uses a standard spade bit. This was told to me by a pro cabinet installer who works in commercial buildings a lot. Majority of forces are shear at bottom, top just holds to wall.

If I were this guy, I would probably remove the rock and put 1/2” plywood.
 

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Pardon my extra question, but in what direction are you putting the wood? I was going to install the 2x6 blocking flat, horizontally at the level of the cabinet tops. I don’t trust using plywood only.
When you think of it, in the average upper cabinet the load is carried by as few as 4 screws, each about 3/16 in diameter. The shear load is on the screws. Another option is to install cut out a section, say around 8" strip of drywall and use 1/2" plywood attached to the studs. Then attach a french cleat to the plywood and hang the cabs on a french cleat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When you think of it, in the average upper cabinet the load is carried by as few as 4 screws, each about 3/16 in diameter. The shear load is on the screws. Another option is to install cut out a section, say around 8" strip of drywall and use 1/2" plywood attached to the studs. Then attach a french cleat to the plywood and hang the cabs on a french cleat.
Ok, that’s an idea also. I’m very happy with the input. Not that I’m going to do the following, since I typically overbuild, but what would be the least/lightest attachment method would any of you recommend?
 

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Ok, that’s an idea also. I’m very happy with the input. Not that I’m going to do the following, since I typically overbuild, but what would be the least/lightest attachment method would any of you recommend?
I don't do least or lightest unless it is also the strongest and most efficient. Almost all of the load of a cabinet is shear load, vertical. Using 1/2" ply is good because besides hitting the studs you can also run some screws, or anchors into the plywood. In a normal dimensional lumber framing you are only hitting studs 16"oc, so some narrow cabs may only have one upper and one lower screw. Also when you connect the cabs together through the face frame or with connectors in the case of frameless, the cabs share the load. I have never had a cab loosen or fall from a wall.
Morristown NJ? I had an Architectural Millwork business and a construction company in Hawthorne for years. Still have two sons in north Jersey.
 

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Hi folks, hope I‘m in the right spot. I want to hang some kitchen cabinets on an existing drywall/metal stud wall, however, I think I should install 2x6 blocking to attach the cabinets. I don’t trust direct fastening to the metal studs themselves.
I was wondering if anyone had any advice for installing wood blocking in an existing wall, short of ripping all the drywall down?
thanks!
If you drill a hole in the metal studs and use toggle bolts it will work alright. The base cabinets I would just use general purpose screws. I would recommend hanging the wall cabinets first. It's easier without the base cabinets there.
 

· mike44
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I have hung kitchen cabinets over sheet rock and metal studs. Conservately speaking at least 700/800 kitchens in my time. Every apartment building in high rises use metal studs. Go to a drywall supply house and ask for "kitchen metal".
The metal is about 1/16" thick and comes in different widths and lengths 4" wide metal is a good choice.
Layout on the wall where your cabinets go. Cut a strip of metal to length. Apply subfloor adhesive with a caulking gun to the drywall in 1/4/3/8" beads in a wavy pattern. Press the kitchen metal .on to the wall and hold it there with drywall screws.The next day remove the screws if they are in the way of the cabinets sitting flush.
You now can screw the cabinets to the metal with cabinet screws that the drywall supply house has.
No need to hit the studs with cabinet screws.
mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have hung kitchen cabinets over sheet rock and metal studs. Conservately speaking at least 700/800 kitchens in my time. Every apartment building in high rises use metal studs. Go to a drywall supply house and ask for "kitchen metal".
The metal is about 1/16" thick and comes in different widths and lengths 4" wide metal is a good choice.
Layout on the wall where your cabinets go. Cut a strip of metal to length. Apply subfloor adhesive with a caulking gun to the drywall in 1/4/3/8" beads in a wavy pattern. Press the kitchen metal .on to the wall and hold it there with drywall screws.The next day remove the screws if they are in the way of the cabinets sitting flush.
You now can screw the cabinets to the metal with cabinet screws that the drywall supply house has.
No need to hit the studs with cabinet screws.mike
Mike, looks like a great idea, but isn’t that just screwing the cabinets to a glued on piece of sheet metal?
Where you state ‘cut strip of metal to length’, is that a strip PER cabinet or a long length to span all the cabinets?
Doesn’t that cause the cabinets to pitch forward slightly from the top, and leave a gap between the cabinet and the back wall?
Please understand I’m not being critical, just looking for more info.
 

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If you drill a hole in the metal studs and use toggle bolts it will work alright. The base cabinets I would just use general purpose screws. I would recommend hanging the wall cabinets first. It's easier without the base cabinets there.
It seems this is a good method, which I also mentioned 😁. I also mentioned something about load forces.

But rather than word of mouth, I think this could be easily researched, maybe even a call or visit to a local cabinet shop?

I‘m also not totally getting the metal and glue, but apparently it works.
 

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I would already have these cabinets hung..We just screw to the metal stubs on commercial. You can feel a metal stud when you screw into it.

As your putting the correct screw in , you will feel a resistance and often will push your cabinet off the wall as the screw starts to thread , then it will pull tight. The problem with most is trying to torque the screw..If you predrill the cabinet before you insert the screw , you won’t feel the cabinet resist, but you will befell the cabinet draw tight..

I hound have taken pictures of a commercial install back in the day..
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I’m a researcher, and I’m doing this to help my brother who lives in Florida, so when I go down there to help him I want to have a plan. I was a metal shop teacher and thin sheet metal only gives you one or 2 shots to get the screw tight without stripping the metal. I plan to install a temporary ledger strip on the bottom to help hold the cabinets while we fasten at the top.
 

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I would get the proper screws ordered..

Take a level and run it around the floor where you are installing. Find the+highest spot start your line there and draw it all the way back.

I always set upper first..Are providing the counter top?
 
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