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Discussion Starter #1
So a few weeks ago I got a new R4512. I love the saw and its a definite upgrade over my 30+ year old C'man contractor's saw. I was looking at a project that would require mounting a sacrificial fence to the miter gauge, and when I looked at the miter gauge for the R4512 I noticed that unlike the old C'man where you could just mount the sacrificial fence with some screws miter gauge on the R4512 is a little different in that is has slots instead of holes. Has anyone else with an R4512 mounted a sacrificial fence to the miter gauge? I have an idea of how to solve the problem using some small carriage bolts, washers, and wingnuts, but just wanted to see if there are any better methods out there.
 

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I have the same TS and having just looked at the miter gauge, it appears to me that you can still use a screw. You might have to use a washer and a short screw. I'm not sure what the older craftsman miter gauge looked like, but at least with my TS it looks to me like you can just use a washer and screw it to the back of a piece of scrap cut to your needs.
 

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It looks similar to a delta(?) gauge I used to use. You can just drive pan head screws into a scrap if you'd like. If you have a t-slot cutting router bit, I prefer to take scraps of mdf or ply and rip them into 4" strips and then rout a t-slot along the back. Two t-track or toilet flange bolts and some knobs make it easy to adjust to your cutting needs as well as replace. I usually make about a dozen or so at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It looks similar to a delta(?) gauge I used to use. You can just drive pan head screws into a scrap if you'd like. If you have a t-slot cutting router bit, I prefer to take scraps of mdf or ply and rip them into 4" strips and then rout a t-slot along the back. Two t-track or toilet flange bolts and some knobs make it easy to adjust to your cutting needs as well as replace. I usually make about a dozen or so at a time.
Matt, thanks for the advice. Nice to intersect here on something about actual woodworking and not just discussions about "Who Is John Galt"!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have the same TS and having just looked at the miter gauge, it appears to me that you can still use a screw. You might have to use a washer and a short screw. I'm not sure what the older craftsman miter gauge looked like, but at least with my TS it looks to me like you can just use a washer and screw it to the back of a piece of scrap cut to your needs.
Yeah, looking at it again I think you're right. Some times being an engineer is a problem, we overlook the simplest of solutions that are right in front of our face!
 
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