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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I've had a old Sears 15" scrollsaw in my shop for years. I initially purchased it from a local Habitat for Humanity store where it was mounted on a janky 2x4 stand with an integrated the motor tensioning mechanism a lot like an old teeter-totter. That is the motor was on the end of big balance board with the motor's weight being the source of the tension.

I don't have any photos of the original setup. While it worked well (surprisingly) I was never very comfortable with the setup or the huge amount of space the things consumed.

Here it is right now without a motor or a base.

After seeing a similar set up on other vintage scrollsaws where the motor is mounted withing the "arc" of the saw, I wanted to tap a couple holes in the base and mount the motor to the tool itself, like this:

The problem is that this 1/3rd HP motor is big like 6" in diameter without mounting bracket. It's also heavy as heck, so the whole thing becomes really bulky. The motor is taller than the table, which reduces function immediately.

What I'm looking for is a recommendation on where to get, and what type of, electric motor should I buy to accomplish my upgraded setup. I've not bought motors by themselves before, I do understand RPMs, HP, and arbor shaft diameter, but aside from that, I'm not sure what I need to look for in terms of power and speed or what would be a good source/price for the sort of motor I need. I do have a couple multi-speed pulleys so I know I can use one of those to manualy adjust speed once I have a suitable motor and mount.

The only places I know to try are McMaster-Carr and Harbor Freight. I would very much appreciate any recommendations on this. Thanks!
 

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This is just my opinion. I would not like that arrangement. The motor positioned inside the arm looks like it would get in the way of the work. It is hard to tell from the angle, but I wonder if the belt will clear the corner of the table. Second, I suspect that the motor you have is perfectly adequate to run the saw and it looks like a good durable motor. Keep it and mount it behind the saw or build a small bench for the saw with a mounting spot below. Be sure to make a shield for the belt.
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I appreciate the response. The problem with this motor is that it's taller than the worktable, it also has a peculiar mounting bracket that raises it even higher. It woudl clear the table, but closer than ideal. Also... I want to use this motor for my vintage cast-iron lathe.

It's just sitting on my desk/assembly table and will go onto some sort of mobile base eventually. The clearance between the pulley and the table surface is 3/4" which should be plenty for a belt. Also, I did see a very nice setup on OWWM.org where the motor was behind the saw, but that also required a very long belt cover and for me, I want to get this as compact as possible.

The older Deltas are set up like this and I've seen one in action that worked very nicely
427103


I think I need a physically smaller motor.
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Available space in my shop is the biggest issue. Recall that I said it will "go onto some sort of mobile base eventually" with "eventually" being the operative word.

At the moment, I don't have a space available to park another "stationary" tool and base. This scrollsaw lives on a shelf under my workbench with my bench top tools (mini lathe, cheapo HFT sander) plus some hand-held power tools and I really can't use it at all.

If someone could recommend an appropriate motor that I could attach to the body, then at least I could put it on my bench top when I need it and use it when I need it. Right now it just takes up space.

Looks like I can't hotlink to OWWM.org, so I'll just share links.

This guy put together a nice set up, but it's really long and unweildy, but it is clearly mobile and is sitting on a workbench. The motor I've got has got is also rather heavy...

For reference-sake, this is closer to how the thing was originally set up - but mine was much more "haphazard" when I got it.
 

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Your problem is two fold. The motor must be small enough in diameter to set below the table top and still provide the power you need. What is the height of the table above the saw frame and what is the minimum power requirements for the saw? Once you know that, you can do some internet searching to find one that will work. I'm not a motor expert. I wonder if there is a relationship between the diameter of the motor and power output.
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Possibly... looking for specs on that motor, thanks. Actually... a variable speed motor kinda excites me as a possible replacement for the single-speed motor on my mini-lathe. I'd just need a rheostat and some sort of mounting setup, as long as it has sufficient power.

I don;t really know the requirements for the saw. The vintage manual doesn't really list anything about the saw's needs, but it was running on a 1/3 HP 115v, 5 amp 1725 RPM motor. The physical motor size seems to be an issue. The clearance between the 'top of the base and work surface is 5-1/2" inches. The motor I've got (and most motors I've found for sale) are large and look to be at least 6" in diameter without the mounting bracket. Most are stupid expensive new, but there are some affordable options on eBay

I do have a Ryobi scroll saw with a small motor that I'm giving up in favor of the vintage cast iron scroll saw. I tried it our and it was pretty useless, but I didn't want to cannibalize it for the motor, which is probably too weak anyway.

I just tore down a washing machine looking for a possible motor option but that unit will be a real challenge to work with despite all the excitement about repurposing them on YouTube. I did get a handy little pump out of it. Note that the machine was a non-working unit left by the house's previous owner as an F-you gift. The guy was a serious jerk. Anyway, I have another, so I can still wash my clothes :^)

I also have a small electric motor I salvaged from a treadmill. I know that arbor is smaller - like 3/8 to 1/2 and I don't know its specs aside from be 110v.

Thanks for the suggestions. Seriously considering the Delta motor...

EDIT...
You know... there are a couple vintage Delta 40-440 scroll saws for sale in my area that have exactly the setup I'm trying to create.
 

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how about a piece of 3/4 plywood long enough to mount the motor behind the saw and wide enough to stabilize the whole thing. fyi you won't be happy with the 1/3hp on a lathe, i had a 1/2hp on my old wood lathe that was too weak. the treadmill motor would be ideal if you saved the drive components at the same time

new motors are pricey, you could probably buy half a dozen craigslist scroll saws for the price of a new motor
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The treadmill was just a belt drive setup. really nothing else to salvage. It was years ago anyhow. Motor's somewhere around here but mounting it was always going to be a challenge. There are 2-3 pretty good Delta 40-440 saws near here. Exchanged messages with a seller who has two fairly complete units. Probably going to go that way. I like clever solutions, but I also appreciate a well-built machine too.

One factor here is that my daughter learned on a solid cast-iron unit in her 8th grade shop class. Covid-19 robbed her of the rest of her 8th grade shop and entirely of her 9th grade shop. I'ld like to set up something here that she's she's comfortable with. She hated the weak-sauce Ryobi scrollsaw. That vintage Sears unit is just too much trouble to configure. I'd like to set up something that she's comfortable with. A lot of kids who take shop aren't lucky-enough to have access to shop tools at home. I want to be an exception that encourages a life-long love of woodworking.
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just to close this discussion out, I'll say that after reviewing motor and configuration options, I gave up on the 15" Sears unit and picked up a pair of vintage 40-440 Delta 24" scrollsaws from a local retired woodworker. One had the matching stand, original motor, belt cover, tensioner, and retirement light but was missing some key "scrollsaw" parts. The other was functionally complete, but the motor had been replaced and the wiring was a bit janky. I judged it to be less worthy of restoration. I raided the parts I needed to make the older more robust saw fully functional.

I paid $300 for the whole package, Not a "steal," but well within the going price for such machines. I get a spare motor and some other spare parts from the deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Also... I have reason to believe that the "newer" saw is actually from 1937 - had the same embossed "Delta" as the advertisement I posted above and no plates or id marks aside from a "1200" label on the front. The "older" saw has stamped ID plates Serial "35-3635" and feature more sophisticated vintage safety equipment like a belt cover.
 

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Your search has ended, but would a 1/2" corded drill have worked? Or do they have a problem with sustained running?
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I expect one of those would have burned out pretty quickly as they rarely have an internal cooling feature.

That does kind of remind me of tools and tricks folks used during the depression and WWII where they literally would run a tablesaw using a power drill.

Edit
Nice kitty BTW!
 
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