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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm researching Drill Presses and key points of a product that are important to Drill Press users and gathering my information to create a simple standard survey (on a scale 1 to 10 how important is...).

I think the best way to create an accurate and useful survey is to talk to those that are familiar with and have knowledge of these tools. I would greatly appreciate any help and feedback that anyone could provide.

In purchasing, owning, and working with a Drill Press, what are some important key points that you take into consideration? Size, speed, price, safety features, etc.? Also, if you could explain what it is about the key point that makes it important to you would be great. If size is important because of the space you work in or if safety is important, what safety features do you look for and so forth. Thank you in advance
 

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A new member asking what may be marketing information or at worse masking a survey for future spam.

It would be useful to provide more background about yourself and how the information will be used.

A lot of forum members are not too eager to give the details you ask to someone we do not know.
 

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Quality of depth stop. Most suck. I love what typically comes on Delta Presses. They must have a patent though, as every one else puts a flawed depth post on the left.
Ease of setting the spindle speed.
Ease of adjusting the table height.
Many now come with laser markers. Not a feature I ever imagined needing. Usually obscured by and worthless when using large bits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dave Paine,

Sorry for not clarifying earlier. I see how what I am asking could make some members wary. But in all honesty I'm trying to learn as much as I can about woodworking in general. The reason I am trying to gather information to generate a survey about Drill Presses is simply for an assignment. As I'm still in the process of learning about woodworking and the tools involved, I thought the best way to be able to have a successful survey is to not only read about but also ask those that know much more about the subject than I do, some questions. It's a survey that is for an assignment and not one that will be used for spam.

I've always found it helpful to go to the people who know the most about a subject when learning about a subject. Forums are always very helpful.
 

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Different strokes(ha) for different folks.....or shops.


One guy may be perfectly happy/satisfied with a Harbor Freight benchtop.

Next shop down the rd........If it isn't old U.S. "arn",it just dosen't feel right.And this is in the ergo dept.,something that these oldie machines have GOBS of.

Little further down the lane,this shop is producing parts that NASA would be proud of,he's using a $10K gearhead or a Moore Jig borer.

All have different requirements,expectations.Good luck with your survey.
 

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I'm trying to learn as much as I can about woodworking in general. The reason I am trying to gather information to generate a survey about Drill Presses is simply for an assignment.
I like to learn by using a tool. Reading is one thing, but as soon as you begin to use a tool you find out very fast what features work, what may not be designed for your needs, and what features may be missing.

Try searching on the site for other drill press threads.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/drill-press-52810/

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/bench-vs-floor-drill-press-54642/

What is important for me is based on my present needs. As I take on different projects I may have different needs.

I started with a bench top radial drill press. Served me for many years. I upgraded to a floor standing drill press with larger swing, bigger motor a couple of years ago.

There are times when I would like a larger quill travel.

There are times when I would like a more flexible method of clamping to the table than my two fixed slots.
 

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the variables

Accuracy, flexibility, stability and capacity.

Accuracy of the spindle and bearings means the chuck and the bits will run without wobbling and be perpendicular to the table. A quality chuck is the answer usually.


Flexibility, what is the maximum dimension from the center of the chuck to the column? How large a piece can you get under the drill and chuck? Does the table have slots or holes to allow for jugs or fixtures? Sometimes a hole needs to be drilled at an angle. You can either tilt the table, wedge up the work at the desired angle, OR tilt the whole drill head on a rotating column usually called a Radial Arm Drill press. http://toolcenter.com/30-140_Radial_Arm_Drill_Press.html

Capacity means how large a shank the chuck accept, usually 1/2".. How much power will the motor and drive system deliver to the chuck without bogging or slipping? And finally, the gripe of most woodworkers, how much travel in the quill .... the more the better. Woodworkers drill deep holes in wood and use longer drills in general than for metal. Having to stop the drill and lower the table to completely bore the hole is a pain.
Floor models will allow taller workpieces under the drill than a bench top model.

Drills are not the only "tool" a drill press will use, there are hole saws and sanding drums. A hole saw takes a lot of power in the larger diameters. The quality of the chuck is important and if it's constantly loosing it's grip, that a pain.


Stability is usually a function of the size of the base and because drill presses are top heavy, the bigger the base, the more stable the machine.

Depth stops are usually a thread rod with an adjusting nut to limit the downward travel. There's not a lot to go wrong with that basic system. The rod is usually flat on both sides to allow the nut to slide up or down without threading. The first clue in looking at a drill press is to notice how long the depth rod is, since that will indicate the quill travel.

I have 2 floor models and 2 bench tops, and use them all depending on the size, type of material and power needed. The range of speeds from the slowest to the fastest, will determine how versatile the machine is for different materials and size drills or accessories. Speed changing via shifting the drive belt or with a variable speed pulley system is vital. The smaller the bit the faster it should spin and vice versa. Metal drilling requires very slow speeds with larger, say 1" diameter, bits than wood drilling of the same size. About 200 RPM in metal and about 1000 RPM in wood, for example.
 

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I have 2 floor models and 2 bench tops, and use them all depending on the size, type of material and power needed. .
Every post I see asking about a certain tool, I see you talking about owning 3-4 of them. I can't imagine the size of your shop... or the clutter I suppose.
 
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