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I love the color contrasts. I'm a big fan of that myself. Is there a reason you went with face grain on the cutting surface?

I recently have made three cutting boards, one each face, end, and edge grain up. Obviously, the end grain is the most work, followed by edge and face is the easiest.

I blogged about them here (with pics):

(edge) http://warriorwoodwork.blogspot.com/2013/08/cutting-board-20.html

(end) http://warriorwoodwork.blogspot.com/2013/07/chopping-block-10-wedding-gift-edition.html

(face) http://warriorwoodwork.blogspot.com/2013/05/cutting-board.html

I'd like to do more end grain work but you've gotta be darn precise lining up glue seams or else it's visibly off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@Gideon Only one of them went through, that one I put some epoxy in but I didn't fill it completely, the rest are all shallow and open so anything in them can be cleaned easily.

@Travico The wood is Ash and Black Walnut, and they are for sale. What doesn't sell will probably be gifted. But I already have sold 1 of them =)

@Warrior I did face grain because it started out just being a way to practice gluing up panels. I needed to work on getting my joints better. The goal is to make a raised panel front to my basement bar. But my wife liked the first cutting board I did she talked me into making more of them. So for now I'll be making my workbench and possible a few more cutting boards. I've sold 2 total and I just quoted one for a coworker who wants an oval shaped one and larger. =)
 
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