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Discussion Starter #4
Because a bucking saw has a straight back, thicker blade and a felling saw is thinner lighter and has a curved back. The curved back allows for a wedge to be driven into the cut sooner. I've been doing some reading tonight, kinda answered my own question. It can be used for both, but better suited for bucking
 

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In History is the Future
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How are they sharpened? My father in law gave me two older ones that I plan to restore at some point.
I came across a really good article with pictures on this - I'll have to check my PC for the bookmark.

You'll notice the tooth pattern is a bit different than a typical hand saw... It's called a Tuttle Pattern. The three triangular shaped teeth scorer the sides of the kerf and the raker tooth then shaves the center out. Think of it as a dado plane with nickers.

With that in mind the raker should only be a couple thousands shorter than the others. I know some peen the rakers and others don't. Also the raker is not set with the others.

I've not messed with it all that much so I can't offer a lot of hands-on suggestions. Again, I'll find that article for ya - it's a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Actually the tooth pattern on my saw is a perforated lance tooth, best suited for softwood. I don't follow on the plate sharpened on the back to creat a felling saw. Are you saying if my saw had no teeth then teeth could be put on the back to create a felling saw? It seems the curve of the blade would be in the wrong direction, concave rather than convex. Please elaborate.
 

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Actually the tooth pattern on my saw is a perforated lance tooth, best suited for softwood. I don't follow on the plate sharpened on the back to creat a felling saw. Are you saying if my saw had no teeth then teeth could be put on the back to create a felling saw? It seems the curve of the blade would be in the wrong direction, concave rather than convex. Please elaborate.
Yes, if I remember correctly the actual configuration of the teeth falls under the Tuttle design patent... I've been wrong before though! And lance is the term for the scoring teeth I couldn't recall earlier :smile:

What I mean by reversing the saw plate is that I have seen many down here that uses the same shape but with toothing on one side or the other depending upon the saws intended use. But for as many of those as I've seen I've also seen as many felling saws without a turtle back at either side - narrower straight plates.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've also found that atlas was the most likely maker for the Montgomery ward saws, so it should be a good saw
 
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