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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the chance to pick one of these up for a song ($40 or less). It seems to have been sitting in a shed for 10+ years and it looks like I'll hafta dig it out and check for wasp nests. Anyway, the current owner sez it does not have key for it so unless I can figure out a key solution prior to purchase, I will be running blind until I get a key. A couple of questions if I may:

What was the quality of this tool? i.e., would I be better off getting one of the older Sears CM units some posts here say are OK? I don't know that my skills or projects will ever need the kind of unit a lot of you folk need.

I know from what I have read here that testing the (trigger?) switch will be one of the first things to do before purchase. They seem to be one of the higher failure modes for this saw.

Is there a way to easily 'hotwire' these things?

Are all the keys for these things the same? Or maybe 4 different versions? Would a locksmith know what I need without me needing to bring in the saw or lock? Maybe just knowing a number code off the lock will suffice?

There is a Youtube video that shows how to use a RAS to cut handhold 'indentions' to the side of a beehive. (If you want to find it search 'beehive handles.' I will see if I can post the link in a subsequent post.) It shows vertically rotating the saw so that the direction of the blade is 90deg to the arm and then rotating the saw ~45deg so that the blade is no longer vertical. I probably am describing it all wrong but if you understand what I am saying, are these adjustments/variations all RASes will make? I was sitting on the fence about getting a RAS until I saw that video. While I saw plans for a jig to make for a handheld circular saw and a video on yt to make the handle cuts, doing it with the RAS was just waaaay toooo sexy and fun looking.

Ad<thanks>vance
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
OK, if I wasn't clear enough, here is info on the video that shows the first thing I wanna do with a RAS.

Youtube: "Bee Hive Box Handle" by Jim Hensel
 

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I had one of those,many years back---not a very useful tool---I used it as a cross cut saw because making angle changes were to time consuming--

However, if you are using this as a dedicated tool for a specific task---like your handle cutting rig--shoot for $40 ,why not?

I don't remember the key---

this jig is for a table saw---looks like a good one---
 

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If you are going to use this as a dedicated tool the price certainly seems right, it was not a top of the line saw but should do what you require of it as it will sit locked in place so moveable accuracy does not come into play.

Depends on the key system, if it is a separate removable key for a switch that locks out the off and on buttons, you can just by-pass it, if it is a key that is part of the actual motor switch that is another story. You could still add an aftermarket switch if you had to.
 

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Some things to check before you plops down your money:

Motor unit should slide smoothly back and forth on the arm.

Motor shaft should turn smoothly.

Using the crank on top of the arm, the arm should go all the way from the bottom to the top of the column.

The arm should swing left and right and detent at the 90 degree and 45 degree positions.

My Dewalt RAS is 35 years young and I still use it regularly.
 

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I've had the TPC-2610C radial arm saw for almost 40 years and I assume that yours is very similar.

You can use a piece of tongue depressor (a popsicle stick is too thick) a half inch by an inch long as a key. All it does is move the lock cam so it allows the trigger to move.

When you start the motor up you will notice that it is very noisy. This is because the spindle shaft is driven by a set of reduction gears. These gears mean that while you can turn the blade by hand , it will be smooth but not quite effortless.

By using the gear reduction Wards was able to design a saw with minimal distance between the motor spindle and the bottom of the housing. This results in a saw that will crosscut finished 4" lumber using a 10" blade. Now look on the right hand side of the motor housing. There is a short spindle that is even with the blade spindle. Wards originally had an accessory shaft that screwed onto the stup and let you install a shaper cutter. Above that spindle is another spindle. This one operates at motor speed which is 20,000 rpm. A different adapter was used for 1/4" shaft router bits.

I have had to replace the original table several times. Every time the replacement got thicker and used a smoother surface.The last incarnation is a "Mr. Sawdust" table with a 1/4" plywood sacrificial top.

If yoyu have more questions please post them here or PM me and I will see if I can help you. This is a good saw and I hope you get as much use from your as I have from mine.
 

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I've had the TPC-2610C radial arm saw for almost 40 years and I assume that yours is very similar.

You can use a piece of tongue depressor (a popsicle stick is too thick) a half inch by an inch long as a key. All it does is move the lock cam so it allows the trigger to move.

When you start the motor up you will notice that it is very noisy. This is because the spindle shaft is driven by a set of reduction gears. These gears mean that while you can turn the blade by hand , it will be smooth but not quite effortless.

By using the gear reduction Wards was able to design a saw with minimal distance between the motor spindle and the bottom of the housing. This results in a saw that will crosscut finished 4" lumber using a 10" blade. Now look on the right hand side of the motor housing. There is a short spindle that is even with the blade spindle. Wards originally had an accessory shaft that screwed onto the stup and let you install a shaper cutter. Above that spindle is another spindle. This one operates at motor speed which is 20,000 rpm. A different adapter was used for 1/4" shaft router bits.

I have had to replace the original table several times. Every time the replacement got thicker and used a smoother surface.The last incarnation is a "Mr. Sawdust" table with a 1/4" plywood sacrificial top.

If yoyu have more questions please post them here or PM me and I will see if I can help you. This is a good saw and I hope you get as much use from your as I have from mine.
Ol'Jim I have a TCP-2610 and am need of carriage bearings. Any suggestions?
 

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Lost key for RAS.
Before you break off a Popsicle stick in the key hole, use your pocket knife. The lock is easily turned, but on my old RAS, you can't pull the key out in the on position. Pulling the key out stops the motor.
Montgomery Wards has been out of business since the '80's, so this saw has some age.
 

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I need help with finding parts too

Ol'Jim I have a TCP-2610 and am need of carriage bearings. Any suggestions?
This is woodworker01;I need the trigger switch assembly for the 2610c.... I had won a RAS on eBay a few years ago just for the bearings,it didn't have the trigger assembly when I went to check it. Any suggestions?
 

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By removing the part that keeps the trigger from being pulled out,you can turn the saw on,just be careful/mindful where the blade is. Use your left hand to pull the handle,keeps right hand well away from blade.
 

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This is woodworker01;I need the trigger switch assembly for the 2610c.... I had won a RAS on eBay a few years ago just for the bearings,it didn't have the trigger assembly when I went to check it. Any suggestions?
Sometimes parts are hard to find or just aren't available for this old saws. If you look at the switch on my saw you'll see it's gone. The switch is improvised under the saw table on the right.
 

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To Steve Neul

Thanks,I'm talking about a Montgomery Wards POWR-KRAFT RAS TPC 2610c,the wires are in the vertical handle and attach to the top and bottom of the switch assembly,Check reply from the email Woodworking Talk sent me form a picture.
 

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Still looking for parts

yea, still looking,toolkraft site is not good,get spam message(?) don't think I have the option of what you did
 

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I've had the TPC-2610C radial arm saw for almost 40 years and I assume that yours is very similar.

You can use a piece of tongue depressor (a popsicle stick is too thick) a half inch by an inch long as a key. All it does is move the lock cam so it allows the trigger to move.

When you start the motor up you will notice that it is very noisy. This is because the spindle shaft is driven by a set of reduction gears. These gears mean that while you can turn the blade by hand , it will be smooth but not quite effortless.

By using the gear reduction Wards was able to design a saw with minimal distance between the motor spindle and the bottom of the housing. This results in a saw that will crosscut finished 4" lumber using a 10" blade. Now look on the right hand side of the motor housing. There is a short spindle that is even with the blade spindle. Wards originally had an accessory shaft that screwed onto the stup and let you install a shaper cutter. Above that spindle is another spindle. This one operates at motor speed which is 20,000 rpm. A different adapter was used for 1/4" shaft router bits.

I have had to replace the original table several times. Every time the replacement got thicker and used a smoother surface.The last incarnation is a "Mr. Sawdust" table with a 1/4" plywood sacrificial top.

If yoyu have more questions please post them here or PM me and I will see if I can help you. This is a good saw and I hope you get as much use from your as I have from mine.
I own one of these saws and the trigger switch in the handle has quit working, can you help? it is a Tecomaster 10" and was bought from Eatons in Canada approx 47 years ago. It has been very well used and is still mv favourite piece of machinery.
 

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Most of these keys were a very simple thin tin metal in a short "L" shape.
Rather than break a stick of in the switch, I recommend trying to turn it on with a small pocket knife.
Or you can fashion a simple key out of a piece of sheet metal with some shears.
 

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Eatons (Canada) Power Craft (USA)

Hello,
I own a 10" radial arm saw that was sold by Eatons in
Canda under the name of Tecomaster.. I purchased the saw roughly 47 years ago, and it has been in constant use since. unfortunately the switch in the handle has quit working. Is there anyone out there who knows where I can find a switch for this unit? I believe in America it was sold by Montgomery Ward under the name Power Craft.

I am not sure I have posted this to the right place
 

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probably not gonna happen ...

If you can remove the switch and post a photo of it, we can compare it to other switches of various types. A saw that old will not have a parts supply obviously.

In the event you can not find a switch that will fit inside the handle there are other ways to operate the saw in a safe manner. If you were to wire those 2 leads together, the saw would be "permanently" ON. You could then add a remote switch, like in a power strip, into which you would plug the saw. Then the power strip switch would become the ON/OFF for the saw. I prefer the switch as close to the handle as possible on my RAS for safety and ease of operation.
 

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Here is a photo of the switch mounted in the handle. I have attached a photo but not sure it is going to come through for you. Let me know, OK?

/Users/fred/Desktop/Saw switch.png

Regards Fred.
 
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