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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I recently finished a project with my daughter--a small bookcase (6" deep by 11" wide) made from oak plywood.

I was wondering about some ideas to trim it--both the top and the sides. I was thinking I could use some oak and just pin nail some oak to the top and sides but was also wondering about some other ideas that might not be extremely difficult to make myself on the router table. (I'm a beginner but willing to try new things)

Links to detailed instructions/videos would be greatly appreciated.

I and my daughter thank you!

SW
 

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Before anyone could really answer that question they would need to see a picture of it and perhaps the furniture in the same room.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Fair enough. Here it is. It's made out of 1/2" oak ply.

You can ignore the furniture in the rest of the room for now :)



Thanks!
 

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Thanks for the replies. Dumb question from someone that's never made a faceframe. Is it joined together and then tacked to the bookcase after joining? Is about 3/4" wide about right for half inch ply?

And, Steve, is I wanted to make the too in your sketch (thanks for drawing that!) how would I do so?

Thanks!

SW
 

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Thanks for the replies. Dumb question from someone that's never made a faceframe. Is it joined together and then tacked to the bookcase after joining? Is about 3/4" wide about right for half inch ply?

And, Steve, is I wanted to make the too in your sketch (thanks for drawing that!) how would I do so?

Thanks!

SW
It's best to make the faceframe and attach it to the box. Pretty much you run some wood 3/4" thick and 1 1/2" to 2" wide to make it out of. Then it can be doweled together or use kreg screws from the back. If the wood isn't too hard you might be able to use corregated fasteners from the back and toenail the corners.

As far as triming it, after a second look I see you have the top rabbeted were the end grain is on the side. I believe instead of adding a top like I pictured I would just miter some molding around the front and both sides of the top. If you want the appearance of the rail you could just put a piece of wood 3/4"x3/4" under the top at the front. The bottom you could make a length of wood about 3" wide with a routed edge. Then miter it around the cabinet the same as you mitered the trim around the top. Then draw the scallop on the front and cut it with a jig saw or band saw. Since that edge faces the floor you don't have to even sand that edge unless you want to. I've seen many factory made pieces of furniture that are just sawn. You would have to attach some kind of blocking to the bottom of the cabinet to mount the base trim to. Depending on how much space you have on the front with the scallop I would probably cut some 2x4's into strips 1" thick by 2" wide.
 

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I would keep the trim simple. Around the top edge, just add a cove moulding to the existing top so the top of the cove is flush to the top. Add it to the front and sides with mitered corners.

Making a face frame would IMO be too bulky for a small cabinet like that. By the time you have the widths of the two sides, the opening would be closed up smaller.

For the front edges, just add a flat moulding the thickness of the edge of the cove leg edge to the sides and bottom, with mitered corners.

Without getting too happy, just make a square edged plinth base to the underside, and let it protrude about ¼" ahead of the sides and front edge. At about 2" to 2½" high, just screw it in from the bottom edge of the pieces. Miter the front edges.






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