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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all! I’m new to this forum and to woodworking, so would appreciate greatly a any advice on how to remédiate what looks like mold on my redwood slab. This slab has been kiln dried. The mold had appeared the more I’ve sanded it, and it appears may be in the grain/wood itself. I’ve read that a bleach mixture can help with mold, but I’m nervous to do this on my table, as I’m hoping to finish it with a natural oil. Any suggestions are appreciated! Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nessa,
It appears to me like the areas in question are where the slab was stickered when first cut. I guess I'd suggest asking the folks at the place where I purchased the kiln dried slab, what can be done.

Hi Dave,

Thank you so much for the reply. I bought the slab raw and before it was kiln dried, and then sent it to be kiln dried after I checked the moisture content. I don’t think they put a sticker on it during the drying process, but I will check in with the company. Thanks again!
 

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I 2nd the stain vs mold idea.
some stains go quite deep - some can be sanded out to almost unnoticeable.
what does the other side look like ??
what are your intentions to make out of it ?

.
 

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Nessa,
It appears to me like the areas in question are where the slab was stickered when first cut. I guess I'd suggest asking the folks at the place where I purchased the kiln dried slab, what can be done.

Hi Dave,

Thank you so much for the reply. I bought the slab raw and before it was kiln dried, and then sent it to be kiln dried after I checked the moisture content. I don’t think they put a sticker on it during the drying process, but I will check in with the company. Thanks again!
Nessa,

Did you read the info in the link?

As to "a sticker" ; "Sticker" in the content of drying wood products, is the piece(s) of wood placed between the layers of wood that is to be dried. The stains on your slab, appear to be going across the grain in the same manner as the supporting boards (AKA stickers)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I 2nd the stain vs mold idea.
some stains go quite deep - some can be sanded out to almost unnoticeable.
what does the other side look like ??
what are your intentions to make out of it ?

Hi John,

The other side is meant to be the bottom, as it had pretty large cracks and gouges that I filled with epoxy. It was my first go with epoxy, so it definitely didn’t come out the best. I’m making a dining room table. Appreciate any and all advice! Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Dave,

Thank you so much for clarifying what sticker refers to. I responded to you assuming the meaning, without having read the article first. Thank you again for your time and I will read the article you shared. Much appreciated!
 

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Nessa,
It appears to me like the areas in question are where the slab was stickered when first cut. I guess I'd suggest asking the folks at the place where I purchased the kiln dried slab, what can be done.

Hi Dave,

Thank you so much for the reply. I bought the slab raw and before it was kiln dried, and then sent it to be kiln dried after I checked the moisture content. I don’t think they put a sticker on it during the drying process, but I will check in with the company. Thanks again!
You have to understand that they set stacks of wood outdoors for weeks if not months in the weather before it gets moved into a dry kiln. The wood can get all kinds of stains on it while sitting outdoors. The color of the stain suggests to me it was something steel which made it. The sawmill I worked at would band rough cut lumber with a steel banding strap however the place I worked at didn't kiln dry anything. It was sold to other places green and I guess kiln dried somewhere else. If it rained a lot on the wood the steel bands would give it a pretty good stain. About all you can do is look for stains in the wood when you buy it. Since stains often run deep you can't expect to sand them out. It might take a lot of surfacing to remove them.
 

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mike44
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Wet a rag or paper towel with Hydrogen Peroxide. Gently rub the rag on the stain. Place rag over the stain for about half a day. remove the rag and inspect the stain. If the stain looks lighter in color but still visible, repeat the process.
If the stain does not lighten , then forget the peroxide solution and sand the stain.
This usually works on hardwoods.
mike
 
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