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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was asked to make this coffee table. The base crosses at a 150 degree angle and the legs are angled in at 12 degrees. The base ended up measuring 55” long, 18” wide and 18” tall. The wood used was mahogany ebonized using india ink and finished with 5 thin coats of lacquer.
 

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Gold Coast. OZ
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I was asked to make this coffee table. The base crosses at a 150 degree angle and the legs are angled in at 12 degrees. The base ended up measuring 55” long, 18” wide and 18” tall. The wood used was mahogany ebonized using india ink and finished with 5 thin coats of lacquer.
Just wondering. Did you not find the Indian ink run when you wet it with the lacquer.

I thought it might, I tried Printers Ink and it virtually washed off. Even though you are in the States, what was the brand of Indian Ink you used so I can check to see what the ingredients of it might be.

Pete
 

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Old School
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I was asked to make this coffee table. The base crosses at a 150 degree angle and the legs are angled in at 12 degrees. The base ended up measuring 55” long, 18” wide and 18” tall. The wood used was mahogany ebonized using india ink and finished with 5 thin coats of lacquer.
The design and finish look very good.




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Just wondering. Did you not find the Indian ink run when you wet it with the lacquer.

I thought it might, I tried Printers Ink and it virtually washed off. Even though you are in the States, what was the brand of Indian Ink you used so I can check to see what the ingredients of it might be.

Pete
The ink shouldn't be getting wet to the point of it "washing off". If the lacquer is sprayed, light coats should dry fast enough not to put the ink in an emulsive state.




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Gold Coast. OZ
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The ink shouldn't be getting wet to the point of it "washing off". If the lacquer is sprayed, light coats should dry fast enough not to put the ink in an emulsive state.









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Thanks for that bit of advice, I did not spray, I will have a play tomorrow on some scrap and give it a light spray to seal it.

Thanks for the tip.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Star. Just like cabinetman said, I sprayed the first coat pretty thin. It was dry within a few minutes. Also, I used Higgins. I Know it is water based. I put two coats of the india ink on to get the deep look and let it dry for a day. Then thinned the lacquer about 50/50 for the first coat. If you have any more questions on the process, let me know. I will answer the best I can.
 

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Gold Coast. OZ
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Hi Star. Just like cabinetman said, I sprayed the first coat pretty thin. It was dry within a few minutes. Also, I used Higgins. I Know it is water based. I put two coats of the india ink on to get the deep look and let it dry for a day. Then thinned the lacquer about 50/50 for the first coat. If you have any more questions on the process, let me know. I will answer the best I can.
Thanks for the info, I did not want to get offtrack from you fantastic build.

I had a quick play in my shed, put some printer's ink on. Why printers ink, because I was given a heap from an old pattern maker.

I did not really let it dry and then gave it a couple of light sprays with some clear spray I had. I am most impressed, no runs.

Now, I know this might be a goer, I better go back and read the instructions.

I like Ebony but did not have much success with trying to Ebonize with steel wool and vinegar etc. Your idea looks way more promising so any more tips would be appreciated.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just used a foam brush to apply the ink. I let it dry for a few hours and applied another coat. Let it dry for 24 hrs then sprayed the lacquer.

I also tried using steel wool and vinegar. I have seen it work pretty well on oak. But on the mahogany it just made it look brown. I even applied tea before the steel wool to raise the tannin level of the wood. I would suggest the india ink to anyone wanting to ebonize wood. Its almost fool proof. Except I did spill a bottle on my workbench, and it penetrates pretty deep into the wood....
 
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