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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI again..

im making a border for a chess board. and i cant seem to get the inside corners of the frame as tight as id like.

Ive read the two recent posts and took those ideas into account.. ive added a stop as to assure equal lengths. ive set up my table saw with a combo square. its should be spot on 45.

any help would be awesome!! thanks..

Josh.
 

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Are those only two pieces of wood?

In the second picture it is obvious that that is not a straight cut. The lower part of both boards angles to the left at the tail. That is what makes me wonder if there are two or four boards. I can think of nothing that would cause that angle unless the board slipped on the miter gauge. However, to think that both boards would slip the same amount at the same place seems rather improbable.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are those only two pieces of wood?

In the second picture it is obvious that that is not a straight cut. The lower part of both boards angles to the left at the tail. That is what makes me wonder if there are two or four boards. I can think of nothing that would cause that angle unless the board slipped on the miter gauge. However, to think that both boards would slip the same amount at the same place seems rather improbable.

George
That is just one of the four corners of the frame. the frame being held together with a strap clamp.

The boards were all cut to the same length using a stop on my miter gauge.

Im not sure why it looks like cut isnt straight. i assure you all the cuts were made very straight.

Josh.
 

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Your square isn't square....or your blade isn't parallel to the miter slot....or there is play in your miter gauge runner.
 

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I would stop fighting the miter gauge. When you add the flexing of the miter gauge head at the pivot point and the inherent difficulty of setting stationary stops for length, followed by the blade attempting to both slide the work down the face of the miter gauge and bend away from the force of the blade is it any wonder that experienced woodworkers make and use sleds! I'm guessing you have fought your problem longer than it would take to make a sled. Almost any Walmart plastic school equilateral triangle is accurate enough for woodworking. I use those as the setup tool for the sled fences.
Mount a slab of good plywood or MDF on runners, push this 1/3 way into the blade. Set the plastic triangle square to the cut you just made and glue some sort of fence to the sides. If you made your fences long enough, then you also have built-in stops.
Never met a miter gauge that was truly trustworthy :censored:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
alrighty guys... thanks for the help.. im gonna mess around in the shop,, and see what i can come up with....

thanks again.

Josh.
 

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While you are messing around .. try taking the play if any out of the miter guide runners, drop the blade lower and this may sound crazy fasten some sandpaper to gauge to keep wood from sliding.... or make a sled,
 
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