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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
have you ever wanted to just shave off a little. This method helps do that in a somewhat more controlled manner than relying on eyesight.

with the chop saw in the lowered position, but the saw NOT RUNING, slide the end to be cut up against the blade blank (that part of the blade that has no teeth). hold the piece in place and allow the saw to raise to it's upper position. make the cut with the piece still in that position.

This principle works because the teeth of the blade extend farther to the side than the blade blank. so by registering the stock against the blank, the cut will remove the difference between the teeth and the blank.

i use it often. try it you'll like it.
 

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have you ever wanted to just shave off a little. This method helps do that in a somewhat more controlled manner than relying on eyesight.

with the chop saw in the lowered position, but the saw NOT RUNING, slide the end to be cut up against the blade blank (that part of the blade that has no teeth). hold the piece in place and allow the saw to raise to it's upper position. make the cut with the piece still in that position.

This principle works because the teeth of the blade extend farther to the side than the blade blank. so by registering the stock against the blank, the cut will remove the difference between the teeth and the blank.

i use it often. try it you'll like it.
I often do this. It usually works out to about 1/32" or less depending on your blade kerf.
 

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have you ever wanted to just shave off a little. This method helps do that in a somewhat more controlled manner than relying on eyesight.

with the chop saw in the lowered position, but the saw NOT RUNING, slide the end to be cut up against the blade blank (that part of the blade that has no teeth). hold the piece in place and allow the saw to raise to it's upper position. make the cut with the piece still in that position.

This principle works because the teeth of the blade extend farther to the side than the blade blank. so by registering the stock against the blank, the cut will remove the difference between the teeth and the blank.

i use it often. try it you'll like it.
That is how I also shave off just a skosh..

George
 

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Wood Snob
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I do that with the table saw too. Only I place the wood against the blade while holding it with the miter gauge. I do this when it's running. Then bring the piece back towards you.

Nothing I hate more than cutting it off twice and it's still too short.


Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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I do that all the time. If you just touch the blade disk, you're going to cut off about 1/64". If you put a little pressure against the blade you're going to remove 1/32" to 3/64".
 

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I keep a wrench hanging on the dust box of my sliding miter saw for quick blade swaps. A good, high tooth count blade on there most of the time, but if I'm cutting something questionable, I change to a lesser quality blade.

With the good blade, I routinely expect to be able to shave off much less than this amount, more like what one could get with a shooting plane. Fence and table needs to be clean and smooth, so you can slide to wood the least little amount. I've done it so much that it's not hard at all.

I do use a touch method, but I touch the tooth and then slide accordingly.
 
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