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Hi,

My 12" Dewalt Miter saw (DWS780) came with a Dewalt 60T blade (DW3126).
What would be considered as essential blades in one's quiver?
Should I replace this default blade with a better quality one?
I've heard great things about the Freud Diablo's.

Was thinking of getting this one, for a great finish: Freud D12100X 100T
Would a 60T and a 100T cover most woodworking projects?

Also, we will be installing some laminate flooring - I suspect I will need a special blade for that as I hear laminate blunts regular blades?
Perhaps something like this? Freud 12" x 72T Thin Kerf Sliding Compound Miter Saw Blade (LU91R012)?

Next year, we might also build an outside wooden patio.

Or maybe I keep the Dewalt 60T and just get the Freud 12" x 72T Thin Kerf Sliding Compound Miter Saw Blade (LU91R012)?

Thank you,
Tom
 

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Saw blades really depend on what you require and they type of work you do. I would stay away from thin kerf, they flex and won’t last as long, and your saw has plenty of power so get a full kerf blade. The 60T DW is fine for general use/construction. IMO Diablo is “ok” but for me, not what I consider an upper tier blade. I don’t think they last as long and I’ve had run out issues. That said, they will most likely fulfill your purposes.

There are blades specified for laminate, before you buy one, I would try the 60T and see how it does. On a visible cut, you can always score a line to prevent tear out, as well as cut it upside down. Keep in mind with a slider you can also make a scoring cut. Remember, a sharp 60T will cut better than a dull 96T.

For fine cuts like moulding you want a high quality blade 80-96T is plenty. What makes a better quality blade is more/better carbide and flatter plates.

I’ve always had good luck with CMT. The durability and quality of cut are excellent. I don’t think Freud is as durable or accurate. FWIW I use this blade (you probably don’t need it tho):

Product Azure Orange Font Screenshot
 

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Termite
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I prefer the Dewalt blades myself and found them to be the cheapest replacement on my DW708...

I still have the original blade on my saw and I've been debating on whether to resharpen if it still seems flat for around $20 or double up and get a new one...

I used it for table building and then finished the blade building my deck.

So I won't be buying an expensive blade for this saw. Found no reason...
 

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Don't use a thin kerf (Diablo's) in your miter saw, they may flex when taking off a "sliver" off an end. You don't need the function/benefits of thin kerfs on crosscuts.
Go full kerf and a good quality/level of carbide, C3. A lesser carbide C2, will work but won't last as long, but for a flooring or deck job, it will probably be fine.
My 20+ year old Dewalt DW708 still has the factory blade on it and it works fine. It's a 12" X 80 tooth, if I recall?
 

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Termite
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i typically keep a woodmaster chop master 80t for cabinet work, and a cheaper dewalt around for junk work.
Wish I could agree, but a facts is a fact.
Wood Table Flooring Hardwood Workbench
Wood Flooring Floor Indoor games and sports Rim
 

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Termite
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If you expect nothing from a saw other than to be a construction saw, that's all it will be.

I expect everything from my tools. When they don't perform, I get another.

I hate thin kerf , but for the 12" Dewalt they perform flawless...

Now I don't use a 12" blade to cut face frames, etc. As a cabinet maker I only really used the 12" for large crown. I used the RAS or tablesaw for raised panels so the 12" just sits. I even replaced the 10" Makita with another 10" Makita slider, but technically I just do really need the 12" for 99& of tye operations.
 

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Imo, you want an economical blade for your chop saw. I tackle this by getting a nice blade and resharpening it. The higher the tooth count, the more expensive to sharpen (and seemingly the shorter the blade life.)

I went with a CMT 80T tri-grind. The triple chip takes a little more to sharpen but lasts longer.

I also have a cheap low tooth count blade for cutting rough stuff that might abrade the blade or find a nail. I don't use it much, but it's there.
 

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I had a bad experience with a Dewalt blade on my mitersaw, it wobbled badly so I never bought another one. I like CMT, Forest the Freud blades. I don't like thin kerf or triple chip blades but that is just me.
 

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Termite
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I've not had a problem with the Dewalt blade. But I've never changed the Dewalt blade on the 708. When I buy a new one I'll know then if it is as good as the first one. I have a few full kerf 12" blades , but prefer not to use them.
 
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