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I have a 10" miter saw and need a new blade badly. I'm not proud of it but I had been using the blade that came with it until recently. I'm aware of the basics, where more teeth means a cleaner but slower cut. I'm just not sure which are quality and which are name.
 

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The correct blade is easily as important as the brand...I'd stick with a blade from Infinity, Ridge Carbide, Tenryu, Freud, Irwin Marples, CMT, Amana, Leitz, DW Precision Trim, Guhdo.

I'd avoid Avanti/Avanti Pro, Workforce, Oldham Contractor, DW Construction, Ryobi, Skil, Vermont America, HF, most Sears, and other off names lest you end up with a blade comparable to most stock blades.

Never met an Infinity blade that didn't impress me a lot. World class performance at a reasonable price.

Best value:
This Oldham Pro 80T blades appears to be from DeWalts top series...made in the US ~ $30 shipped. Heck of a bargain.

Keep them clean....
 

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John
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Like scott said, the correct blade is easily as important as the brand. The brands he listed are all excellent but blade selection within the brand is also important and that depends upon what and how you are making the cuts. Since you are asking specifically about a miter saw, we will assume cross cuts but now we need to consider type of miter saw (slider or fixed) and type of material. If you have a slider, you should be looking for a less aggressive hook angle, somewhere between -5° and +5°. If you are cutting mostly solid wood, you would be looking for a ATB or HiATB tooth configuration. If you are cutting mostly laminates, melamine, MDF, or veneered plywood you would be shopping for a TCG tooth configuration.
This link may help some
http://www.diablotools.com/blades-10.html
There is also a load of information in the stickys on table saws.
Good Luck:smile:
 

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Master firewood maker
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Re the Oldham blades, I found this:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Oldham-1...hing-Saw-Blade-10060TP/100091036#.UbyOxtzD8dU

It (at least this particular Oldham blade) is apparently made in China. The one above is a 60T blade, not "Pro Series", but the price is pretty close to the one on ebay, so ... <shrug>

Grizzly has a lot of Oldham blades too, but none of them are just like the 80T Pro one Scott pointed to. They are expensive.

I am not arguing with Scott or anything, just adding more (possibly useless) information.

I could use a new blade on my 10" miter saw too ... if enough of you say the Oldham Pro 80T would be "good enough" for a hobby woodworker, and that the $30 shipped is a good buy, I can see myself grabbing one.
 

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John
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Update: I just bought this blade! Since I am an Amazon Prime member, I got free 2-day shipping.

Freud LU88R010 10-Inch 60 Tooth ATB Thin Kerf Crosscutting Saw Blade with 5/8-Inch Arbor and PermaShield Coating - Amazon.com
The LU88 is a great blade....it's super in a TS as a very clean cutting general purpose blade for most tasks except thick ripping much over 1", it'll do a nice job with ply, and fine crosscuts too. The hook angle is 15° (the reason it rips so well), which is too steep for a slider, but should be ok for a CMS.

Re: the $20 Oldham blades at HD.....you did well to avoid it IMO. Honestly, that exact blade is what prompted my initial quest for a good blade shortly after I first got started. At the time I thought $20 for a carbide tipped blade was expensive and that it would certainly guarantee me good long term performance....I was wrong, even to an undiscerning newbie it cut poorly, and dulled quickly. It was no different than most stock blades. I was so ticked off, that it led to the obsession of trying and testing nearly 70 blades over the next decade! :laughing: I should be grateful, because it led to an interesting journey that I never planned on, but the feeling of being disappointed in that blade still makes my blood pressure rise! This is a great example of why you need to be particular about series and model number, and not just rely on a brand name....brands are marketing tools more than anything. Names get bought, sold, used, and abused, often at the expense of the unknowing consumer. Oldham does have some good blades....like the Signature Series, and this particular Pro Series model (I don't think the other Pro Series blades are like this one though). The 80T Oldham Pro has nothing in common with the 60T Oldham "Industrial" or Contractor blades ...those are just stamped steel mass produced Chinese mediocrity at it's finest, that benefits the seller more than the buyer. Sorry for the rant....I do feel a little better now.! :blush:

In this case, it looks to me as though they've slapped the Oldham Pro logo on a DeWalt Precision Trim DW3218PT (Oldham and DW are now both owned by Stanley B&D):


oldhampro80.JPG
 

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All good advice and you bought a good blade. BUT, you have to have others in case you do want to just chop up some 2x4 or other crap lumber.
 

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Master firewood maker
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Thanks Scott. It's going into my miter saw. The blade in there now is a 32T Avanti Pro :thumbdown:

Fire65, I hope you are not telling me that it's not good for crosscutting 2x4s with a miter saw ... ?
 

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John
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For working with construction lumber I bought a set of deWalt construction blades. I think there was a 40 tooth and a 60 tooth in a package for ~$30. I just drop those on the saw(s) when I'm cutting those rather than using up the good blades. :smile:
 

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Thanks Scott. It's going into my miter saw. The blade in there now is a 32T Avanti Pro :thumbdown:

Fire65, I hope you are not telling me that it's not good for crosscutting 2x4s with a miter saw ... ?

LOL, well some of the people that use my shop have no idea about this. I wrote on my table," Please change blade for material being cut." I hate to see my good blades abused.
 

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Master firewood maker
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ok ... now i'm confused again (that is really easy to do!)

SPF is hard on saw blades? maybe it's a big no-no, but pine is what most of my stuff is made from. either that or 1/2" or 3/4" ply.

what is it ... the resin in the pine? it certainly can't be the hardness ...

so I should use a crappy blade just because it's pine? what if I want a nice, clean cut?
 

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John
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ok ... now i'm confused again (that is really easy to do!)

SPF is hard on saw blades? maybe it's a big no-no, but pine is what most of my stuff is made from. either that or 1/2" or 3/4" ply.

what is it ... the resin in the pine? it certainly can't be the hardness ...

so I should use a crappy blade just because it's pine? what if I want a nice, clean cut?
What scott said, keep 'em clean. Almost everything I do is pine, plywood or mdf, or some combination of some or all. Of those, MDF is probably the hardest on the blades, followed by plywood and then solid pine. Pressure treated lumber doesn't help blades much either but I think that is mostly the wet cr** in the PT stuff.
I have a Freud Fusion blade I use only when I want an exceptional cut. Most of the time I use a 50 tooth Onsrud I picked off eBay for $20. I really don't like running MDF over my Fusion, it just takes the edge off the HiATB tooth grind.
I do clean the saw blades and router bits regularly.
 

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Master firewood maker
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The Freud blade came today. I am very excited to put it on my miter saw. I am 100% certain that it will be 1000% better than the blad that is on there today.

So GISer, where is your head at on this topic?
 
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