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Discussion Starter #1
I built myself a couple of sleds mainly because my miter gauge wasn't perfect straight out of the box. Recently I took the time to eliminate slop and added about a 30" fence leaving my sled to collect dust. It's so much easier to move that around than my heavy sled. Plus, it's much easier to slide the fence when needed to eliminate tear out. So I guess my question is, what's my sled have that my gauge doesn't? Depth/stability? Haven't noticed a loss really.
 

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It depends on your sled and what work you do. A double runner sled has more stability for heavy or longer stock. Clamps are easier to attach to a sled and you can use backers for cutting materials that have to be held on bevels or shapes that need support. Longer sleds are often used for ripping, straightening an edge and cutting long tapers. They are also handy for very small pieces that you don't want to hold by hand. The platform makes it possible to attach anything in various positions. For jigs like finger joints, you often want to hold the stock on each side of the blade with a tall back support. Things like this aren't a good choice because of the fulcrum effect they would have just on a miter gauge.

I use the miter gauge with a wood bar attached quite a lot. I may make a jig and attach it to the miter gauge. I also have several sleds. Wouldn't want to be without any of them. I need all the options and different cuts can require different types of holding capabilities.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I can dial in my miter gauge just as accurate as my sleds. My sleds start off perfect, but after a couple months of moving, lifting, hanging, and sliding they get a little play in them. Miter gauge doesn't stay perfect neither, but to me it's a whole lot easier to get it back that way.

Maybe I just like the ease of moving and the space saved? That could be why I'm showing favoritism. The other listed advantages I can see, I just haven't ran across these scenarios. I'm gonna keep my sleds for when they do though.
 

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With wide boards to cut, a sled is my chosen rig. Once the miter gauge slides off the edge of the table (to fit that wide board in front of the blade) it is tippy/useless IMO.
 

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where's my table saw?
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miter gauge advantages

If you need to make a bevel, you will destroy your slide's ZCI herf and accuracy. You can use a miter gauge with a fence extension like this without any ill effects other than a angled kerf. (not shown here)


You can make a quick and dirty sled using two identical miter gauges and an extended fence with a brace brace for stability. This is lighter and smaller than a full blown sled and easier to store. For the entire boring discussion go here: http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/crosscut-sled-jig-30811/

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Zero clearance isn't much of an issue. I bought some extrusion and attached some wood to that. The extrusion stays fixed but the wood slides along as the end is cut away. An idea taken from askwoodman on YouTube.
 

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I am lucky enough to have a Powermatic 66 table saw.I feel a lot better cutting a 18" wide by 60" long piece of oak on a sled than I do a miter gauge.Just a lot more stable and accurate.
 

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I have an Incra 1000HD miter gauge and it's extremely accurate for 90° and angled crosscuts on pieces that are not very wide. I use it instead of my sled because it's easier, for those cuts, then dragging out my sled. As stated, once you have to pull it back far enough that the cross bar leaves the table, it's useless. That is when I pull out the sled and I couldn't imagine working without having a sled.
 
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